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18 results for Carolina Trees & Branches Vol. 24 Issue No. 2, April 2015
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Record #:
38888
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Abstract:
Pemisapan (Wingina was King of Algonquian Indians on Roanoke Island and land across from it. He is first mentioned by Arthur Barlowe in his fact finding mission report of 1584 to Sir Walter Raleigh. In 1585, the Ralph Lane colony settled on Roanoke Island and Wingina took the name Pemisapan. Pemisapan decided to unite the coastal tribes to destroy the English and Ralph Lane decided he was a trouble maker that need to be destroyed. On June 15, 1586, Lane and twenty five men crossed the Croatan Sound and called Pemisapan and a few Indians out. Lane’s men then shot them; Pemisapan being crippled ran for the woods and was shot in the buttocks. He was killed in the woods by Thomas Harriot and Edward Nugent, who returned with the king’s severed head.
Record #:
38885
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Crawford/Crafford appears in the NC colony in 1665, working with an agent of the Lord’s Proprietors. In 1670 he became a member of the Albemarle Council. He became a leader in Cary’s Rebellion and his home was prison to several of the NC colony officers, including acting Governor, Thomas Miller. Crawford made frequent trips to England where he served as Power of Attorney in the NC colony for several merchants in London. In the mid 1690’s Crawford and his wife moved to Norfolk Co., VA, where he died.
Record #:
38886
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Andrew Pendleton, a native of Nixonton, Pasquotank Co., NC, worked as a mail carrier and in a drugstore. In 1884, he graduated from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He set up his first practice in Coinjock, NC, then in Key West, FL and later in Elizabeth City. Pendleton established the Standard Drug Company, was postmaster of Elizabeth City and was president of the Elizabeth City Board of Alderman. Pendleton organized and was president of the Carolina Banking and Trust Company and the Pasquotank Investment Corporation.
Record #:
38891
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John Blount, a native of Chowan County, NC, became a member of the NC Council and Justice of the General Court. In 1686, he inherited a tract of land that became known as ‘Mulberry Hill,’ and accumulated over 1,600 acres. In 1701, Blount was appointed vestryman of the first vestry of St. Paul’s Parish, Chowan Co., NC. In 1722, Blount became a Proprietary deputy with a seat on the NC Council.
Record #:
38887
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Abstract:
These are queries about the ancestry of Joshua White (1796-1865) and wife Millicent Reddick of Perquimans County; the ancestry of Thomas Poole and wife Margaret Forbes of Camden Co., NC; the family of John Scott and wife Rebecca of the Berea Section of Pasquotank County, NC; and the ancestry of William Davis and Margaret Ann Pool.
Record #:
38889
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Abstract:
Christopher Merchant appears in the Albemarle region by 1679 and served in government by being a Council member, Clerk of Council, customs collector for Currituck port, Clerk of Currituck Precinct Court, and as Deputy Escheator for Currituck. He owned 908 acres in northern Currituck precinct.
Record #:
38890
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Fredrick Blount, born at Mulberry Hill, Chowan Co., NC, studied medicine in Philadelphia and settled in Hillsborough, NC. In 1806, he moved to New Bern, NC where he lived as a planter and doctor.
Record #:
38896
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Abstract:
Thomas Barker, a native of Rhode Island, arrived in Edenton, NC in 1735 and by 1741 moved to a plantation in Bertie Co., NC. He began a political career being a clerk in the Lower House of Commons in 1736, a member of the NC Assembly from Bertie County in 1742 and selected as Public Treasurer for the northern district. He was a successful attorney in Edenton, NC and continued in politics and was chosen to represent the NC colony in England in 1761. After living in England, the Revolutionary War broke out and he could not get back to North Carolina until 1778. After his extended absence, Barker was no longer a citizen by law and had to take the oath of Allegiance to stop the forfeiture of his property to the State. In 1779, he was granted citizenship and retired from public service.
Record #:
38895
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Abstract:
Stephen Cabarrus, a native of France, appeared in Edenton, NC in 1776, married Mrs. Jeanne Bodley and became master of his wife’s estate, ‘Pembroke,’ near Edenton, NC and accumulated 1,980 acres by 1777. He represented Chowan County and Edenton in the NC House of Commons from 1784 to 1805. Cabarrus was a delegate to the 1788 Hillsborough Convention and to the Fayetteville Convention pf 1789 that ratified the Constitution. During his tenure as speaker of the NC House of Commons, the legislature agreed to locate a permanent seat of government in Raleigh, NC. The NC legislature recognized his contributions to the State and named Cabarrus County in his honor. He was appointed to the first Board of Trustees of UNC-Chapel Hill in 1789.
Record #:
38898
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Aaron Marshal Elliott, a native of Pasquotank Co., NC, moved with his family in 1847 to the Deep River community in Guilford Co., NC. He graduated from Harvard University in 1868, spent the next eight years in Europe, tutoring first and then studying in various universities. In 1876, Elliott began teaching Romance languages at John Hopkins University and did much pioneer work in organizing the scientific study of modern language and literature. Elliott was prized for his talents and for his never failing cheerfulness.
Record #:
38900
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Abstract:
Josiah Collins, Sr., a native of England, came to America in 1773 and settled in Halifax Co., NC in 1777. He later moved to Edenton, NC where he was a leading merchant, Judge of the Admiralty Court, and a member of the Council of State. Collins was a land speculator, developed the land around Lake Phelps, producing rice, wheat and lumber. He owned the large plantation, ‘Somerset,’ had nearly 100 slaves, owned over 25,650 acres in Tennessee, and helped to restore old St. Paul’s Church in Edenton.
Record #:
38894
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Joseph Blount Cheshire, received his law license in 1836, but gave it up to become a minister. He was ordained a deacon in Christ Church, Raleigh, NC in 1840 and ordained as priest at St. James Church, Wilmington, NC in 1841. He established Trinity Church in Scotland Neck, NC; remaining rector for thirty-five years. In 1842, he also became rector of Calvary Church, Tarboro, NC, serving both churches. In 1861, Cheshire was involved in the printing of the only edition ever issued of the Prayer Book of the Confederate States.
Record #:
38899
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Abstract:
Joseph Blount Skinner, a native of Perquimans Co., NC, was a lawyer, planter, and pioneer in the herring and shad fishing industry. In 1804, he represented Chowan County in the NC House of Commons and in 1807, 1814, 1815 and 1832 represented Edenton in the NC House of Commons. In 1832, Skinner was elected to the NC Council of State and in 1833 was a Senator from Chowan County. His plantation, Beechwood, near Edenton, NC was a model scientific farm.
Record #:
38897
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Abstract:
Stephen Pool, a native of Pasquotank Co., NC, was licensed to preach in 1856, became an educator and then university president at UNC-Chapel Hill, which led to the closure of the university during Reconstruction. He also served as US Deputy Appraiser in North Carolina in 1866 and continued to preach and teach the university closed.
Record #:
38892
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Hunt was a Quaker, who settled in Pasquotank County, NC and appears in 1664 as a NC Council member and a Justice. He was a ship captain, merchant, and owned 1,300 acres.