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5 results for Carolina Planning Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983
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Record #:
15873
Author(s):
Abstract:
Salem Lake watershed is the source for 40 percent of the city-county drinking water supply for Winston-Salem and Forsythe County. Salem Lake's watershed is situated in three governmental jurisdictions, the town of Kernersville, the city of Winston-Salem, and the county of Forsythe, all of which use the property for different purposes.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983, p8-11, il, map, f
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Record #:
15878
Author(s):
Abstract:
County health departments have an important role in protecting water supplies; as more developers elect to construct private wastewater treatment facilities, the control of public health problems has county health departments worried. Issues of public management of private wastewater systems concern on-site disposal systems serving individual homes or several homes, as well as on or off-site community systems. Package treatment plants have recently received the most attention. Ongoing problems with malfunctioning private systems and package treatment plants go beyond public health concerns and hit the municipalities in the pocket. Who pays for necessary repairs or replacement when the private wastewater system fails and the public sector must step in to operate and manage?
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983, p30-34, map, f
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Record #:
15877
Author(s):
Abstract:
Coastal North Carolina has about 2.3 million acres of marsh, wetlands, creeks, rivers, and sounds, making up the largest estuarine system on the Atlantic coast. Productivity of fish and shellfish breeding in this system depends upon an influx of nutrients and fresh water from upland areas. The health of this estuarine system is a good indicator of how well water resources are being protected in North Carolina. Currently, the large agricultural interests disagree with concerned commercial fishermen saying fresh-water fishing grounds are being polluted with farm chemicals.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983, p27-29, il
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Record #:
15876
Author(s):
Abstract:
The effective reuse of waterfront sites, buildings, and piers, both for economic development and recreational and cultural activities, is occurring in several cities. Baltimore, Boston, Seattle, and other cities are discovering new uses for their abandoned or deteriorating waterfronts, and in the process attracting people and revenue to the revitalized harbors. Successful redevelopment varies widely but there are several issues common to all waterfront projects: handling regulations and permits, deciding on the appropriate use of the waterfront, providing public access, and ensuring citizen participation.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983, p15-19, f
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Record #:
15875
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many regions in North Carolina have experienced tremendous increases in population growth and industrial development in the past decade, the Piedmont and Mountain regions being no exception. One of the many implications of this dramatic growth is the depletion of water supplies. Most public water supplies in these regions are from surface water sources (streams, lakes and reservoirs); to keep pace with demand, new surface water sources will have to be developed.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Winter 1983, p12-14, il, map
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