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4 results for Carolina Planning Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer 1984
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Record #:
15879
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Abstract:
The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Properties Commission is the historic preservation agency for the City Council of Charlotte and the Board of Commissioners of Mecklenburg County. The commission is empowered to recommend the designation of buildings, structures, sites, and objects as historic property. Such designation, enacted under the police power of the local governing board which exercises zoning control over the subject property, places historic landmarks under land use regulations which protect the property from insensitive alterations and inadvertent demolition. Moreover, the commission has the power to secure the fee simple or lesser interest, and can dispose of the same properties through lease or sale with protective covenants included to ensure their preservation.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer 1984, p10-13, f
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Record #:
15882
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Main Street Program was initiated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist small towns in revitalizing their downtowns. In 1980, the National Main Street Center was established with grants from six federal agencies. That same year the program was expanded to include five towns in each of six states; North Carolina was selected as one of the six states. North Carolina towns chosen to be part of the national program were Tarboro, Washington, Salisbury, New Bern, and Shelby.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer 1984, p34-38, f
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Record #:
15880
Author(s):
Abstract:
Until recently, strip development has been viewed primarily as a land use issue. Such development, however, has a strong relationship to the transportation system. Methods for dealing with the effects of strip development on roadways have rarely been handled in a consistent manner. Access management is a method for controlling the impacts of strip development on the roadway system which effectively balances the access needs of the roadways.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer 1984, p19-21, il
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Record #:
15881
Abstract:
This article traces the evolution of undergraduate planning education at East Carolina University with emphasis on curriculum development.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer 1984, p31-33, 38, f
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