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4 results for Carolina Gardener Vol. 26 Issue 4, May 2014
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Record #:
21863
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There are about 175 species of butterflies in the state. The eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly is perhaps the most recognizable with its yellow body with black stripes and a wingspan between three and six inches. In 2011 Frances Parnell and the Cape Fear Garden Club, Inc. of Wilmington began lobbying the NC General Assembly for a North Carolina Butterfly Symbol, and in June 2012 the eastern tiger swallowtail was so named.
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Record #:
21864
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Through the years Chase has created gardens that would help feed her family. Recently she has been exploring \"drinkable\" gardens--plants that become beverages, wines, juices, ciders, teas, and syrups. Using yield, reliability, and ease of care as determinants, Chase presents five choices of drinkable plants for the Carolinas--crabapple, serviceberry, prickly pear cactus, muscadine, and bay laurel.
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Record #:
21862
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Public gardens are a treasure, and the Carolinas have a number of them for visitors to enjoy. These include Brookgreen Gardens (Murrell's Inlet, SC), North Carolina Botanical Garden (Chapel Hill, NC), Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden (Kernersville, NC) and Swan Lake (Sumter, SC).
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 26 Issue 4, May 2014, p32-36, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21875
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Build a house in the South; put a large porch on it, and a swing just has to go with it. McElvain share remembrances of this very Southern custom.
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