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5 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 34 Issue 4, Apr 2014
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21839
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North Carolina ranks fifth in peanut production, producing 435 million pounds in 2012 with a value of $150 million. Luther Powell and his brother-in-law, Jonathan Stokes, started a farm-supply business in in Windsor in Bertie County in 1919. Peanuts was one of the crops they purchased. Although they shared peanuts at the store and in meetings, it was not until 1992 that they began marketing their well-known product, Bertie County Peanuts.
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Record #:
21838
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Many biotechnology discoveries and products are made in the state. The $59 billion it puts into the state's economy is second behind agriculture, and it employs 237,000 people. Business North Carolina recently gathered a panel of experts to discuss questions such as What role will biotechnology play in the state's future? and What does it need to get there? as well as other questions. The published transcript is edited for brevity and clarity.
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21840
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On February 2, 2014, a storage pond at a retired Duke Energy coal-fired power plant in Eden poured over 2.35 million gallons of toxic water and about 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River. It was the third-largest coal-ash spill in the nation's history. Martin recounts events before and after the spill. A map locates the fourteen sites where Duke Energy stores 106 million tons of coal-ash; some plants are active and some are retired. Cleaning up the coal-ash ponds could cost customers over $1 billion.
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Record #:
21841
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Harold Varner graduated from East Carolina University in 2012. At the University he was a member of the golf team, and in 2012 he became the first ECU men's golfer to win Conference USA player of the year. He is also the first African American to win the NC Amateur Championship. Now he has his sights set on becoming one of the rarest things in golf--an African American pro.
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21842
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The North Carolina Golf Panel, a group of about 135 journalists, golf pros, college coaches, noted amateurs, and business leaders, rank North Carolina's top one hundred courses. A minimum of forty had to vote for a course for it to qualify, and panelists could only vote for the ones they've played.
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