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8 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 25 Issue 7, July 2005
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7279
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In September 2004, Steve Skolsky was appointed CEO of Morrisville-based Trimeris, Inc. The company produces the drug Fuzeon, which won federal approval in 2003 for the treatment of AIDS. It is the only drug that prevents infection of white blood cells. Skolsky, a 1982 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill in biology, started his career in the lab before moving into marketing and sales. He worked for several scientific companies, including Burroughs Wellcome and Glaxo, before Trimeris recruited him.
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Record #:
7282
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In January, 2005, the sale of the 50,000-circulation Durham daily, The Herald-Sun, to the Paxton Media Group of Paducah, KY was completed. Paxton owns twenty-eight other newspapers around the nation with an average circulation of 30,000. On the day the sale was completed, Paxton Media fired and escorted to the parking lot members of the Herlad-Sun's staff, starting with the paper's publisher and president. Approximately eighty positions were eliminated. Gray discusses the takeover; the emphasis given to the firings and takeover by the Raleigh News and Observer and Durham's Independent Weekly and whether the emphasis was justified or not; and what the new ownership will mean to the Durham Herlad-Sun and its readers.
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Record #:
7280
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Sally Kay, a 1988 graduate of Clemson University, is president of The Hosiery Association. After graduation, she worked in the hospitality industry in Charlotte. In 1990, she went to work for what was then known as the National Association of Hosiery Manufacturers. In 2001, she was elected the association's first woman president. The 300 association members make and distribute approximately 85 percent of the country's hosiery. About half of the hosiery mills are located in North Carolina. Kay discusses some of her job activities.
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Record #:
7278
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In August 2004, Tom Eager was appointed CEO of the N.C. State Ports Authority. Having begun as a delivery truck driver, he brings three decades of shipping experience to the job. North Carolina's ports employ about 4,000 at Morehead City and Wilmington. Channel-deepening has increased tonnage in Wilmington by 25%, and Eager plans to expand the port by adding three container-shipping lines over the next three years.
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Record #:
7281
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Pinehurst hosted the 1999 U.S. Open Golfing Championship, and the tournament returned in June 2005 to play on Pinehurst Resort's No. 2 course. Roush discusses the five-year planning that goes into hosting a golf tournament and how the 2005 event compared with the 1999 one.
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Record #:
7302
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Best Doctors, Inc., is a Boston-based company that rates physicians. Its approach is unique. The company asks practicing physicians what specialists they would go to if they needed to see a doctor. Best Doctors then verifies these recommended doctors' licenses and board certifications and checks for any disciplinary actions against them. The company then asks the doctors a series of questions about their experience, practice, and research. BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA lists doctors in the state who made the list in twenty-one specialties, including cardiovascular, infectious disease, nephrology, and ophthalmology.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 25 Issue 7, July 2005, p50-52, 54, 56, 58-63, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7300
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Steve Troxler was elected North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture in November 2004. A broken voting machine which failed to record 4,400 votes delayed his actual certification as commissioner until February 2005. Troxler discusses his plans for the agribusiness in North Carolina.
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Record #:
7338
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A paper mill built on the Pigeon River in 1905 brought prosperity to the town of Canton for nearly a century, though the plant pumped pollutants into the river for years. Threats of lawsuits by two states and the federal government forced the company into fifteen years of pollution remediation. This, coupled with depressed paper prices and increasing competition, brought the mill to the verge of a shutdown in 1997when the mill was put up for sale. In 1999, the employees and their union bought it.
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