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4 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 25 Issue 6, June 2005
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Record #:
7312
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Sandy Jordan is the new director of business recruitment for the North Carolina Department of Commerce, succeeding Ray Denny, who retired. Jordan is from the executive-on-loan program at Progress Energy, where he is vice president of economic development. Progress Energy will pay his salary. Jordan brings twenty years experience in economic development to his new position. He will work with the department's economic developers in North Carolina's seven regional partnerships to bring more business to the state.
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Record #:
7311
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A survey conducted by the Washington, D.C. based National Federation of Independent Business reveals that small business owners in North Carolina are less satisfied with local business conditions than small business owners in neighboring states. State small business owners feel they deal with more environmental, tax, and safety regulations and a higher cost for employees' health insurance than do their neighboring peers.
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Record #:
7313
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As a young man, Donald Haack hunted diamonds in exotic places. Haack, former chairman of Charlotte's Foreign Trade Zone and World Trade Association, is the founder of Donald Haack's Diamonds and Fine Gems in Charlotte. The business employs eighteen and an average sale is between $6,000 and $10,000. Haack recently published a book called BUSH PILOT IN DIAMOND COUNTRY, which recounts his life a diamond miner, trader, and broker.
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Record #:
7314
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The view of an attractive skyline, easy access to sports arenas and the arts, and the convenience and cachet of urban living make downtown Charlotte an attractive place to live. The city is awash in plans for residential high-rises. Between April 2004 and April 2005, seven high-rises were announced, ranging from 13 to 53 stories and totaling over 1,700 residential units. Many of the units were sold even before construction began.
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