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5 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 24 Issue 8, Aug 2004
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Record #:
6848
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Abstract:
In the early 1990s, Gary Bryant owned a Hickory Hams shop. With sandwich sales outdistancing packaged hams, he saw a need for an upscale sandwich shop. He sold his business and opened the first Bear Rock Cafe in Greensboro in 1997. Today there are twenty-nine restaurants in nine states, including sixteen in North Carolina. The restaurants feature a mountain lodge décor and a varied menu of salads and sandwiches. Revenues in 2003 were $16 million.
Record #:
6850
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's top seventy-five public companies are ranked by their June, 2004, market value. Bank of America ranks No. 1, followed by Wachovia and Lowe's. Charlotte-based MedCath, which operates heart hospitals, made the biggest advance, jumping twenty-one place to No. 44. Five companies dropped off the list. Five companies made the Top 75 for the first time or returned after missing the cut last year.
Record #:
6847
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ken Peacock did not plan for a career in higher education. A tax planner and auditor, he began teaching income taxation at Winston-Salem State University in 1973. Thirty-one years later, he is still in higher education. He spent twenty years at Appalachian State University as a teacher and administrator. On July 1, 2004, he was named ASU's sixth chancellor.
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Record #:
6849
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outdoor drama, a blending of historical story lines with singing and dancing, was created in North Carolina. The state has three of the nation's oldest-–\"The Lost Colony\" (Manteo), \"Unto These Hills\" (Cherokee), and \"Horn in the West\" (Boone). Two have sound financial footing; one does not. Vora discusses how productions are paid for and why audiences of these oldest of outdoor dramas are slipping away.
Record #:
6851
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Biltmore Estate in Asheville is one of North Carolina's premier tourist attractions. Visitors are usually unaware of the many activities that go on behind the scenes to keep the place running for their enjoyment. Vora describes some of the activities of the estate's 1,600 employees, such as mowing pasture-size lawns, repairing building damage brought on by a century of wear and weather, and making wine.