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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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1812 results for "Wildlife in North Carolina"
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Record #:
36156
Author(s):
Abstract:
This collection of the top ten photos included categories such as ages of the photographers, plants, landscapes, outdoor recreation, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, and animal behavior. Nearly all of the winners came from towns in North Carolina’s three regions.
Record #:
36157
Author(s):
Abstract:
A forest food spotlighted was the Golden Chantarelle, a variety of fungus. Described in detail were its five hundred year foraging history, distinctive features, and medicinal properties.
Record #:
36163
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.
Record #:
36159
Author(s):
Abstract:
Information related to these animals included differences among the three categories, features of the Virginia Big Eared Bat and Northern Pine Snake, and ways to help such species survive.
Record #:
36160
Author(s):
Abstract:
A combination of written and photo documentation proved the time it took and process involved in a forest’s recovery from a set fire. Through his documentation, the author asserted this action, commonly done in the South every one to five years, can replenish and cleanse its landscape.
Record #:
36162
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dogs handlers were traditionally men in middle and late adulthood, noted the author. Since the 1980s, though, he’d observed women increasingly becoming part of the sport’s ranks. Profiles of four women and description of wild bird hunting proved dog handling and its associated activities were indiscriminate regarding sex and gender.
Record #:
36161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parts of the wild turkey not consumed were used in ingenious ways, Native American groups had proven for hundreds of years. The anatomical parts that could be decorative or utilitarian included the wild turkey’s bones, spurs, feathers, and beards.
Record #:
36164
Author(s):
Abstract:
A physically and economically feasible solution for the decrease of forests: bird boxes. Among the species that could make this structure for the birds were bluebirds and Carolina wrens.
Record #:
36165
Author(s):
Abstract:
The recovery of the wild turkey’s population helped to assure the ongoing need for turkey calls, an important tool in a hunter’s kit. Included was directions for making a scratch box turkey call and images of turkey calls that prove them decorative and utilitarian.
Record #:
36166
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shelter often entails providing for the basic needs of life, and shoreline creatures are no exception. Among life calling lakes and ponds at and below the surface home were the duck potato and duckweek, the great blue heron and leopard frog.
Record #:
36158
Author(s):
Abstract:
Information related to bat house construction included ideal sites and times of the year to build. Diagrams and a description outlining steps of the construction process were offered to assure regular occupancy by the otherwise picky dwellers.
Record #:
34400
Abstract:
Ocean fishing piers have been a part of the North Carolina seascape for over ninety years, since the construction of the state’s first ocean pier at Kure Beach in 1923. In the 1970s through the late 1980s, as many as thirty-five functioning fishing piers graced over three-hundred miles of North Carolina’s ocean coastline. Because different species tend to gravitate to different areas of the surf, there are five fishing zones along the pier which require different techniques and gear.
Record #:
34398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biologist Susan Campbell has been banding and studying ruby-throated hummingbirds in North Carolina for over twenty years. Her research has shown that these hummingbirds usually return to the same location every spring. More and more hummingbirds have been found overwintering along the coast, especially in the Outer Banks, due to warmer climate and plentiful food.
Record #:
34399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Crappie are one of anglers’ favorite freshwater fish in North Carolina. The fish are spread out in shallow water during the spring, but move to deeper water in the summer. Two Triangle-area fishing guides share their knowledge and offer tips on catching crappie in Jordan Reservoir and Shearon Harris Lake.
Record #:
34402
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry Snuggs combines his passion for woodworking and fish into a unique artform called Uncle Henry’s Artofishals. Similar to decoy carvings used in duck hunting or ice fishing, Henry carves and paints decorative fish that he calls “realistic folk art.” The carvings are three-dimensional and suspended, making the fish appear to be swimming.
Subject(s):