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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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1874 results for "Wildlife in North Carolina"
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Record #:
43262
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In this article the author is talking about a Fish Cookery and Preparation Class for Women that is ran through the NC Wildlife Resources Commission’s Pechmann Fishing Education Center in the town of Fayetteville. This class is taught to help women or individuals with learning how to scale, pan dressing, skinning, and filleting fish. After learning these skills the participants were tested by working with the commission staff and volunteers to make five different dishes. The purpose of this event was to teach anglers with fundamental skills to be able to take the fish they fetch then transform them into a meal. This class consisted differing levels of experience from new anglers to anglers with years of experience.
Record #:
43269
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The author states that by monitor the nest boxes of barn owls they will be able learn more about their populations and how they are distributed. The author states that they also want to learn barn owl nesting time, clutch size, and nest success. The questions the Barn Owl Project is trying to answer is: what factors play a role in occupancy, what happens to juveniles when they leave the nest, what is the distance the adults travel to hunt, and what is the frequency of adults returning to the nest. The author discusses that these answers can be obtained through banding of the Barn Owls.
Record #:
43268
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In this article the author is talking about the elusive barn owl. The author discuss the differences between a barn owl and other owls like they hiss and scream instead of hooting and they nest on top of their own pellets instead of building a nest. The barn owl is hard to research because of their secretive and nocturnal nature. The species of greatest conservation need in the North Carolina Wildlife Action Plan hope to better understand the Barn owl’s population size, nesting habits, and distribution.
Record #:
43263
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In this article the author discusses the important of safety gear while hunting. The author talks about how it is common place for hunters who they have talked neglect the use of safety equipment. The author talks about their own experiences of not using ear protection while going to the range and while working concert security and now has to deal with tinnitus. The author lately lists certain situations where specific safety gear would be needed or at least should be used.
Record #:
43264
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In this article the author is talking about safe hunting for children. The author discusses staring children on dove, rabbits, and squirrel hunting. The author discusses that we are seeing children first getting introduced to hunting with turkey and deer hunting. The author discusses it is important to start children off on smaller game as well as on short hunting trips.
Record #:
43275
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In this article the author is discussing the detail about the Barn Owl Project. The author is discussing the historical changes of where barn owls nest which was silos and barns which are becoming fewer. The author states that hunters have been helping out with creating new nesting areas for barn owls without even knowing through the installation of permanent deer hunting boxes. This is what started the Barn Owl Project in which started the creation of original nesting boxes. These nesting boxes would be installed on private properties but this lead to another question which was how could they tell if a barn owl population was present. The Barn Owl Project think had the idea that the nest boxes were too small for North Carolina barn owls which preferred larger nesting boxes. The Barn Owl Project also learned that just installing nesting box on a property does not mean that barn owls will use it unless there is already a barn owl population present.
Record #:
43272
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In this article the author is discussing the building of better nest boxes for the Barn Owl which simulate the natural nesting areas the Barn Owl use. The author talks about that the containers being used as nesting boxes are made from 250-275 gallon intermediate bulk containers. The author says that other barn owls around the country use smaller nesting boxes but the barn owl in North Carolina have been shown to no like using the smaller nesting boxes. The hope for the use of these larger nesting boxes is so that when barn owls are moved from where they are interfering with human activity they still have a safe nesting choice. The author is discussing that they are working to install these new nesting boxes in areas with active barn owl populations and are looking to install more nesting boxes.
Record #:
43273
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In this article the author is talking about in importance and emphasis on the processing of an animal after the kill and how to bring new hunters into this process. One thing the author emphasizes in this article to paying respect to the animals that you kills. The author talks about wiping away blood before taking pictures as well as not sitting on or disrespecting the animal’s body. One point the author makes is that when taking his daughter out for hunting that she wanted to hold the gun and be involved but if she said that she could not do it that would also be okay. The author discussed that their son knew that any animals they hunted would be eaten and knew that including him into the hunting process.
Record #:
43274
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In this article the author wants to emphasis that your observations for bird watching does not have to end with just identifying what bird it is. There are many different observations that one can make during bird watching which would include behaviors, particular song the bird sings, how many birds are there, and do you see a nest. The author lists a website where you can find a list of these different types of observations.
Record #:
43276
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In this article the author is discussing their expectations when hunting as a child and how their father handled this as well. The author states that when they first started hunting they had no expectations of having successful hunting trips. The author states that no matter if they was able to catching anything or just watched the animals while hunting their father still was happy no matter. The main focus of this article was how the author’s father helped manage their expectations.
Record #:
43281
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In this article the author discusses he different exceptions to the rule for egg size and color corresponding the adult bird’s size and nesting location. The benefit of the Kiwi laying large eggs meant that the chicks would be born almost fully grown, feathered, and with their eyes open which this increased their predator avoidance. The size of the egg is also advantages for the Kiwi because it provided the chick with enough substance to sustain them until they were prepared to forage on their own. The author states that there are North Carolina birds that hatch similar to the Kiwi. These North Carolina birds are the bobwhite quail and piping plover but there were differences in nutrition and the sizes of their eggs were smaller than the Kiwi’s.
Record #:
43280
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In this article the author is discussing the difference in bird eggs and some of the reasons behind it. The author states that bird eggs can differ depending on the size and where the adult bird nests. There is an exception to this rule when it comes to the New Zealand Kiwi where the eggs they lay are 20% of their body size. The color of a bird’s eggs normally is dependent on where the bird is nesting because the coloration is meant for camouflage. There is some exceptions to this rule as well when it comes to the American Robin which lays light blue eggs. The light blue coloration helps regulate the amount of sunlight the egg receives. The author states that there are exceptions to the rule because these characteristics play a role in survival which takes many different characteristics into consideration.
Record #:
43305
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In this article the author is talking about the less well known diamondback terrapins and the decline in their populations. The diamondback terrapin gets its name from the concentric ring pattern on its upper shell. The author discusses that the diamondback terrapin lives in brackish waters which is where fresh water flows into saltwater. Native American have traditionally hunted the diamondback terrapin for consumption. The author discusses that during this time the turtle was considered to be a cheap and reliable source of food up until the mid-1800’s where the wealthy considered turtle soup to be a delicacy. This has caused an increase of wild farming and the creation of commercial farming of the diamondback terrapin. One incident that has been seen to have saved the diamond back terrapin was The Great Depression because not even the wealthiest could not reasonably pay for “turtle soup.”
Record #:
43310
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In this article the author is discussing how they, a fish biologist, got into the study of the Crystal skippers. The Crystal skipper is a rare kind of butterfly that inhabits the North Carolina coast. The author discussed that they got started on this research path when they took a walk on the beach with Dr. Leidner who just finished their doctoral research on the Crystal skipper. Dr. Leidner was moving to Washington D.C. and discussed with the author about them taking over the research project of the Crystal skippers.
Record #:
43330
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Abstract:
In this article the author was discussing the changes that the commission had approved in regard to the amount of fish being captured per day. The author discussed that the commission had approve a rule that would limit the amount of fish that could be kept and that amount would be one to two and they also reduced the length of the season. The commission stated that the limit of fish being kept to one or two was to help manage the harvesting quota. The commission also stated that they are optimistic with the reductions in fishes kept will help with the spawning fish in both the Roanoke river and the Albemarle sound. History has shown that reductions like in the past helped to reduce the decline in the fish populations in these body of waters.