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133 results for "North Carolina State Bar Journal"
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Record #:
35052
Author(s):
Abstract:
The disturbing news, as revealed by the author, involved audited lawyers who fail to reconcile their client trust accounts. What heightened the level of disturbance was the number of incidences, as well as the number of lawyers who repeatedly committed this unethical behavior. In fact, there was a deterrent put into place that involved disciplinary action for non-compliance that failed to curb the count. Accordingly, there was a program created to help lawyers responsibly handle their clients’ trust accounts, the TAC Program.
Record #:
35058
Author(s):
Abstract:
Internet based advertising—was the savage beast not easily tamed for lawyers such as the author. Noted challenges that made online promotion of services a creature discomfort were advertising strategies cited as violations of the Rules of Professional Conduct, words taken out of context, and lawyers almost being barred from using a chat service in their web-based ads.
Record #:
35056
Author(s):
Abstract:
An interview with NC native George Oliver focused on the topic of certification: why he decided to get certified, how he prepared for certification, certification’s benefits to his practice, certification’s benefits to his clients, and the benefits of certification to the overall profession.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35059
Abstract:
The Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court reflected on the complicated relationship between the NC Justice System and the citizens impacted by it. The development of a statewide system in the 1950s made the Tar Heel State the envy of its stately neighbors, but its citizens’ opinion was less than admiring. Evidence that Justice Mitchell displayed, though, made a compelling case for the state’s justice system as all it’s purported to be.
Record #:
35072
Author(s):
Abstract:
Willis Whichard’s account of life as a public servant over a period of thirty years focused on the early family and educational influences that led him to become a lawyer and mentors that shaped his performance and perception as a representative of the legal profession.
Record #:
35075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dennis Wicker’s definition of the North Carolina Promise cited reasons for and importance of giving back to the Tar Heel State and its people, particularly for public servants. The former Lieutenant Governor’s reflection included a description of and influences for his legal career.
Record #:
35074
Author(s):
Abstract:
Watt’s account of his service as a United States congressman related the presence of and reasons for his perception that serving the underrepresented citizens of NC’s Twelfth District has been a rewarding and challenging experience.
Record #:
35071
Author(s):
Abstract:
Senator Leslie Winner’s account reflected on the reasons why she decided to run for Senate, her experience as a Senator, and the consequences of striving to balance a public and personal life.
Record #:
35069
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former Attorney General and Governor Easley reflection focused on two legal profession related topics: the purposes of the Attorney General for the people of North Carolina; major laws enacted during the 1990s in NC; and how litigation and mediation serves to protect the public.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carl Horn’s reflection on the legal profession in the United States includes a description of and reasons for the present pervasive dissatisfaction of lawyers, cultural changes that have contributed to their sense of dissatisfaction, and possible solutions that can restore meaningfulness and fulfillment to the profession.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35079
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though the classic film is referenced to and inspired the author’s view of the legal profession, The executive director of the North Carolina State Bar’s account is truly about how the State Bar contributes to the value and roles of legal representatives of the Old North State.
Record #:
35102
Author(s):
Abstract:
In regards to this issue, Michael Dayton, editor of Lawyers Weekly since 1988, offered reasons why sexual relations between clients and their attorneys occur, sexual relations are more likely to involve female clients, and why this misconduct should be prohibited. As additional evidence, the author cited examples of landmark cases related to this issue.
Record #:
35104
Abstract:
The Bates that Lunsford in this case referred to a United States Supreme court case that took twenty years to be resolved. The case, Bates vs Arizona State Bar, involved protection of the First Amendment to the commercial speech (as in, advertisement) of lawyers’ services. The issue was resolved by offering two proposals: proposal A, one which required certain information to be disclosed about the lawyer; proposal B, which prohibited advertising that was false, deceptive, or misleading.
Record #:
35103
Abstract:
What an attorney can do in the event that he/she is aware that a client will offer false information for a case? As Jerry Parnell revealed, a lawyer has three options: privately remonstrate the client; seek withdrawal from the case; if withdrawal will not resolve the issue or cannot be done, disclose the delicate matter to the court.
Record #:
35403
Abstract:
The authors asserted that the revised Rules of Professional Conduct will impact the State Bar’s disciplinary process in a number of ways. Revised Rule 1.18 is the most marked revision in the text designed to create guidelines for acceptable conduct and crystalize the lawyers’ professional obligations. What the authors concluded is what’s most noticeable about the revised Rules: the Bar’s interpretation of “revised” was open for debate.