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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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213 results for "North Carolina Insight"
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Record #:
19519
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XDS, Inc. in Pittsboro is a nonprofit mental health and developmental disabilities service provider for over 130 customers. XDS provides long-term care for patients with dual-diagnoses that often fall through the cracks in the medical system. Despite the myriad of services that XDS provides, the state's shift to Critical Access Behavioral Health Agencies, this organization was in fear of being shut down. Now approved as a CABHA, XDS merged with the UNC Center for Excellence in Community Mental Health to provide a continuum of care.
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19520
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Freedom House Recovery Center in Chapel Hill is one of the best private providers of mental health services in North Carolina. However, state funding limits the services they are able to provide for the 10,000 mental health and substance abuse citizens.
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19522
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Since 1964, The Wright School in Durham has welcomed children ages 6-12 with severe emotional and behavioral diagnoses. Children come to the state-operated residential school for re-education, providing them and their families the skills and knowledge to help them acclimatize to their community.
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19521
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Duda and Rash discuss the mental health system in North Carolina, along with the services provided for those with developmental disabilities and substance abuse issues.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 23/24 Issue 4/1, Dec 2012, p24-38, 42-43, 47-49, il, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19518
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Rash discusses the history the mental health system in North Carolina and how the past has affected the motivations for future reform.
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Record #:
18894
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The state offers citizens with mental health, developmental disabilities, and substance abuse problems a variety of treatment options through 15 different facilities. It is estimated that 14 percent of the state's population requires one form or another of these services. Of the fifteen facilities are four psychiatric hospitals, three developmental centers, three neuro-medical centers, three alcohol and drug abuse treatment centers, and two residential facilities for children with severe emotional/behavioral disorders. The article looks at these facilities and the number of citizens using services offered by the same.
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Record #:
18659
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At the close of the 20th-century, the state's population had increasingly grown older with only 3.5 percent of citizens over 65 in 1900 to 12 percent in 2000. These numbers are expected to increase further, the percentage projected to double by 2030. An aging population requires state leaders to consider how older populations can contribute to society and what services this group will need. The article presents a statistical breakdown of the 65 plus age demographic and compares state information with national data.
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Record #:
18660
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Elder fraud is the financial exploitation of the state's older population. National statistics indicate older generations lose $40 billion per year to fraudulent electronic scams. The state's fifty and older population accounts for more than 25 percent of fraud complaints and identity thefts reportedly annually. The article reports not only on the schemes but who perpetrates these crimes.
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Record #:
18674
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Medicaid is the state sponsored health program to cover low-income families but rising health care costs deplete funds available to those in need. To supplement the Medicaid program Community Care Program and PACE now contribute to the healthcare of the state's older population. The Community Care of North Carolina deals with management of health issues across the state. The Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly assists those too frail to live alone without assistance.
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Record #:
18675
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The 65 and older population of the state in general demonstrate a sense of civic duty, typically voting more, involved in public service, and are generally contribute more to their communities. Statistical evidence supporting this claim is presented showing disparities between generations in voter turnout and participation numbers in religious and non-secular community activities.
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Record #:
18740
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The state's community college system was developed in the 1960s by W. Dallas Herring, former Chairman of the State Board of Education. By 2008, changing economic dynamics prompted a reevaluation of the system and how to meet the state's educational, and ultimately employment, needs. The author assesses what he determined to be four critical areas of concern faced by community colleges (\"nontraditional\" students, completion rates, work force shortage, and lack of infrastructure for students) and how to overcome these issues to create a more productive system and better educated and qualified workforce for the state.
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Record #:
18760
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Historically, the community college system developed to provide the state with a qualified work-force to fill manufacturing jobs beginning with Buncombe County Junior College in 1928. Having been organized into a state-wide system in 1963 under the Community College Act, this network of institutions faced contemporary problems of changing economic demands throughout the early 2000s. The author presents the history of the community college system to try and anticipate how this institution will need to adapt to future developments within the state's evolving economy.
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Record #:
18762
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The article reviews the diverse student population served by community colleges with a statistical breakdown of enrolled students by age, race, part-time or full-time. Compared with the University of North Carolina system, community college students can be qualified as 'non-traditional' and working students. Trends within the enrollments in the community college system reflect diversifying demographics for the entire state.
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Record #:
18834
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New educational programs developed within the community college system to meet growing industries. Two of the fastest growing markets within the state include aquaculture, cultivation of water-based plants and animals, and viticulture, cultivation of grapes. Discussed are curriculum changes within the community college system to supply new areas of study and how these academic tracks can be transferred to the UNC system.
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Record #:
18835
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North Carolina economy shifted from manufacturing to service based and created a gap in the workforce. Vacancies in such jobs as allied health, nursing, pharmaceuticals, and laboratory technicians were not being filled adequately with skilled workers. The author proposes five changes to the community college system to be enacted both by the General Assembly and State Board of Education to facilitate community college's offering degrees to fill theses openings. Some of these proposed changes included differentiated funding for certain community college programs and establishing licensure track degrees exclusively through the community college system.
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