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126 results for "Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin"
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Record #:
6962
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Charles Baldwin, a conductor on the Wilmington & Manchester Railroad, was killed in a train accident and buried in Wilmington at Oakdale Cemetery on January 8, 1856. He was bachelor, a man who worked hard and had the respect of all who knew him. He also appears to be the individual at the heart of the most enduring railroad legend of the Lower Cape Fear region, that of Joe Baldwin and the Maco Light. Burke discusses the particulars of the legend.
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Record #:
28688
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Charles Baldwin, a conductor for the Wilmington & Manchester Railroad, died in a railroad accident in 1856. Details of his death have been told as are several legends, all of which depict Baldwin as a hero.
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Record #:
6721
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The article discusses the construction of the David Reid Murchison house in Wilmington in the late 19th-century. Also included are alterations to the house, a list of family members connected with the house over the years, and owners of the house after the Murchison family.
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5414
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The life of Catherine Ann McKay Fulton is profiled. Fulton was born in Southport on September 9, 1821, and died in Portsmouth, Virginia, January 5, 1898. She was a longtime resident of Wilmington.
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Record #:
7329
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The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts played an important role in the early religious life of colonial North Carolina. The SPG, chartered on June 16, 1701, sent Christian missionaries to the colony until the Revolutionary War. Between 1701 and 1783, about forty-six Anglican clergymen served in North Carolina. Sheppard discusses the role they played, the difficulties of procuring missionaries for the colony, and some notable missionaries from this period, including Richard Marsden. Sources for Anglican research are provided at the end of the article.
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Record #:
28687
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This issue presents a letter written by Eliza Yonge Wootten to her husband Reverend Edward Wootten on November 8, 1898. The letter provides considerable insight into the mindset of some citizens during the 1898 political and cultural climate of Wilmington, North Carolina.
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5413
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This reprint of Jane Dalziel Wood's report on a local relief project in Wilmington describes the 1931 Block Messenger System which was created for War Relief work. The plan was \"to have a representative in each city block who was known as a messenger, to collect small change each week from voluntary contributors.\" The money was used to employ unemployed men in building a road.
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Record #:
5487
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William Ashe was a man who saw what needed to be done and gave 100 percent effort to do it. Cooke discusses his life in politics before the Civil War and his assignment as Assistant Quartermaster in charge of all rail transportation east of the Mississippi during the war.
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5486
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Robert Ruark grew up in Wilmington in a house that had great meaning to him. It was, he wrote, \"a cathedral to ancient times.\" Using quotes from Ruark's writings and other individuals, Glover describes the house as Ruark knew it and what happened to it after he moved away.
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Record #:
5408
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Lawrence Lee was many things during his life -- CPA, businessman, world traveler -- but his first love was history. He taught history at the Citadel and wrote a number of books on the subject. One of his greatest achievements was fulfilling his childhood dream of finding Brunswick Town, as well as other \"lost\" North Carolina sites. Lee was one of the founders of the Lower Cape Fear Historical Society in 1957.
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Record #:
5488
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Railroading began in England in 1825, and by the 1830s, had reached North Carolina, offering a shipping alternative to turnpikes, canals, and steamboats. By 1860, 834 miles of track had been laid. Watson discusses the rise of railroads in the years leading up to the Civil War.
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28686
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Laurence Sterne’s eccentric novel, “The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman,” was popular during colonial times. One of Sterne’s admirers was a physician, Dr. John Eustace of Wilmington, North Carolina. Letters exchanged between Eustace and Sterne reveal details about early connections between Sterne and Wilmington landmarks.
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Record #:
4466
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The outbreak of World War II placed Robert Ruark's writing career on hold. Enlisting in the Navy, Ruark served in the Armed Guard aboard merchant ships transporting supplies to the Allies. Glover chronicles some of Ruark's wartime experiences and summarizes his postwar writing career, which included the novels Something of Value, Uhuru, and Poor No More.
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Lower Cape Fear Historical Society Bulletin (NoCar F 262 C2 L6x), Vol. 44 Issue 1, Oct 1999, p1-15, por, bibl, f
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Record #:
5384
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A collection of letters belonging to the family of Mary Eloise Bethell that were written during World War II gives a picture of life on the homefront in Wilmington. The letters are from officers at nearby Camp Davis who rented rooms at the Bethell home when they came to town.
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Record #:
5407
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The impact of World War II on Wilmington between 1941 and 1945 is discussed by Smith. Military construction was in high gear and included the following projects: a coastal artillery base; Camp Davis, which housed 20,000 soldiers; Army Air Force fields in New Hanover County; and naval and coast guard centers in Brunswick County. Housing was a great need, as were eating and entertainment places. However, the great prosperity also bought a rise in crime and related social problems.
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