NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


34 results for "Greenville Times"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
24811
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wimpies Steam Bar and Grill has undergone renovations and introduced a new seasonal schedule for its reopening. The changes include a roving oyster shucker, new bar area, patio area, and paved parking lot. New items have also been added to the menu to compliment old favorites. Wimpies Steam Bar and Grill has been serving food to Winterville for more than 20 years.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p16-27, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
36214
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the pastel paintings of local artist Richard Wilson, place can be defined by rural and urban landscapes and buildings, by time periods and lifeways of times gone by. Accompanying the portrait of his life were sixteen of his award winning portraits.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Dec 2014/Jan 2015 , p24-34
Record #:
36220
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ayden’s George Snyder captured French and Japanese influences in furniture and wallpaper murals. Among the descriptions of his works, capturing a broader view of history, were details of his personal history, which revealed a lifelong and intergenerational passion for art.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p30-38
Record #:
24813
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vik Sexton, a Greenville artist, presents fun but creepy sculptures made of clay. She has developed her own unique way of painting them to give them a more matte appearance and to make any color she wants. Her pieces include ‘Terror-Dactyls,’ Franklin heads, and a piece entitled the ‘Worst Toy Ever.’ Sexton has been working with clay since she was a small child and has been taking her work to shows for years.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p29-36, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
24765
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many buildings downtown in Greenville once contained a number of prominent retailers. A site on Fifth Street first held the Glascow Evans Livery stable in 1890. Other companies used the same site, but the first major company to lease the building was Montgomery Ward in 1928. In 1932, Quinn-Miller Furniture moved in, then Belk-Tyler in 1938. Today, the building houses Crossbones Tavern and apartments.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Winter 2015, p48-51, il
Full Text:
Record #:
36219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edward Teach’s story is reflected in his dwellings and dealings in towns such as Beaufort and Bath. Blackbeard’s legend can be explained in exploits before and after his capture in 1718.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p29
Record #:
24050
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Flanagan Buggy Company formerly occupied the corner of Fourth and Cotanche Streets in Greenville, North Carolina, a space that now houses a parking garage. The Flanagan business dates back to 1866 and has an interesting history from its establishment to the time of its closure in 1969.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015, p44-47, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
30528
Author(s):
Abstract:
C. Heber Forbes, a leading merchant in Greenville, renovated the old Anderson house on the corner of Tenth and Cotanche Streets into one of the most memorable houses in Greenville. Forbes went to St. Louis and bought the interior furnishings from a house owned by the Lambert family, makers of Listerine mouthwash. He purchased architectural details, mantels, mouldings, lighting, silk covered chairs, thick wool carpets and other French style furnishings and brought it all back to Greenville by train. The house was gutted and dissembled in 1976 and taken to Simpson, NC.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Summer 2015, p51, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36216
Author(s):
Abstract:
A town that began as a tobacco and cotton post has grown into a top ten city in North Carolina. Profiled were employers such as Burroughs-Wellcome and East Carolina University; infrastructure challenges such as traffic congestion and urban sprawl; and advantages such as a strong industrial base and medical employment opportunities.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Dec 2014/Jan 2015 , p52-57
Record #:
36217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in 1980, the Marathon is largely known for its Greek dishes. However, the restaurant currently owned by Perry Kachroo has kept up with food trends of the times by including Indian items on its menu. Collectively, this explains its place as what the author described as an institution in the community.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p12-17
Record #:
24808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Briley’s Farm is a family owned farm providing produce to Greenville throughout the year and has been for 35 years. They host many activities throughout the year including pick your own strawberries in the spring, a corn maze, pick your own pumpkin, birthday parties, field trips, company retreats, and much more for everyone from children to adults.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p48-55, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
30533
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old Evans home, built 1910-11, for James Lewis Evans (1889-1970), was once located on Charles Blvd. beside the old Pitt Plaza (later Colonial Mall).
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015, p49, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30524
Author(s):
Abstract:
Every autumn, Ruby and Leon Joyner sold pumpkins on their front lawn at their old home on Charles Blvd. for 25 years.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p42, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
30525
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Imperial Tobacco Company building, built in the early 1900s of Dickinson Avenue, was at one time one of the Greenville tobacco markets largest buyers of tobacco for export. Abandoned by the company in 1978, the building, which covered two city blocks, was slated to be restored and renovated into a long awaited arts and community venue. In the midst of getting the beginning legal work finished, the building tragically burned down from arson. on April 17, 2008. In 2007, local artist Matthew Cook began a series of paintings using the Imperial Tobacco Company as his subject, painting views from all over town. The structure's fiery death became the subject of one last painting to end the series. The article gives a portfolio of some the paintings in the series.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p45-47
Subject(s):
Record #:
24814
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the 1840’s there has been a conflict between those cutting down and those planting trees in Greenville. Every time trees were planted, they were eventually cut down or damaged. In 1990, this problem was patched with the formation of ReLeaf. ReLeaf is a non-profit organization that plants and protects trees using donations from the community.
Source:
Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , October/November 2014, p38-41, il
Full Text: