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62 results for "CHES Studies"
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Record #:
1914
Author(s):
Abstract:
Persons 65 and older comprise 12% of North Carolina's population, yet they account for 27% of inpatient hospital discharges, 38% of hospital bed days and 40% of hospital charges. Nelson examines this age group's inpatient hospital usage.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 78, Dec 1993, p1-24, il, bibl
Record #:
1920
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's Division of Blind Services maintains one of the only population-based registers for the diabetes-related visually-impaired in the U.S. Sullivan discusses the register's usefulness and its flaws.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 71, Jan 1993, p1-8, bibl
Record #:
1919
Author(s):
Abstract:
Statistics from the 1988-1990 North Carolina Birth Defects Registry are presented. Statistical tables give the reader perspectives on the prevalence of birth defects in the state as well as orientation to using and interpreting birth defects data.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 74, May 1993, p1-9, bibl
Record #:
1918
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1990 Census indicates that one in every four persons in North Carolina is a member of a minority group. Surles presents race-specific analyses of the socio-demographic characteristics of North Carolina's minorities.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 72, Apr 1993, p1-31, il, bibl
Record #:
1932
Abstract:
The Community Diagnosis process in North Carolina identifies health problems locally and communicates these problems to the state. It is hoped this approach will assist in allocating funds on a priority basis to meet documented health needs.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 63, Apr 1992, p1-7, il
Record #:
1931
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report examines how well North Carolina is meeting 30 national health objectives that are grouped under the following headings: preventative health services, health protection, and health promotion.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 65, June 1992, p1-67, il, bibl
Record #:
1930
Abstract:
This study examines the prevalence of maternal diabetes in North Carolina, as estimated from vital records and hospital discharge reports, and describes some of the major demographic risk factors in the pregnant population.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 64, May 1992, p1-8, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
2058
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community Diagnosis (CDx), a state-mandated program, concluded that top health problems in 1994 included teenage pregnancy and infant mortality, while legislative priorities were headed by money for new facilities and adolescent pregnancy prevention.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 85, Oct 1994, p1-9, il
Record #:
2093
Author(s):
Abstract:
While new cases of prostate cancer do not vary greatly by race in North Carolina, the state leads the nation in prostate cancer deaths among blacks. Stage-at-diagnosis was the most important determinant for survival.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 90, Jan 1995, p2-10, il, bibl
Record #:
2094
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sixteen paper mills operate in twelve North Carolina counties. Concern by citizens over the possible link between mill emissions and increased cancer risk led the Central Cancer Registry to develop a study. The results did not support such a link.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 86, Nov 1994, p1-13, il, f
Record #:
2131
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1991, the state set objectives to improve citizens' health by the year 2000. To date only one objective, reducing teenage pregnancy for ages 15-17, has been met, while others have not yet been achieved.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 87, Nov 1994, p1-32, il, bibl
Record #:
2132
Abstract:
Between 1988 and 1992, infant mortality declined, improving the state's ranking from 49th to 43rd. Further reduction can be achieved if the state's leading causes of infant death, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), can be attacked.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 88, Nov 1994, p1-8, il, bibl
Record #:
2161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some areas of adolescent (ages 10-19) health, such as infant mortality and motor vehicle mortality, have improved in the state; however, the rates of adolescent pregnancy, unmarried childbearing, sexually transmitted disease, and suicide continue to rise.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 89, Jan 1995, p1-66, il, bibl
Record #:
2165
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1988-1992, 78% of all AIDS victims in NC were adults aged 25-44. Highest mortality rates were in the eastern part of the state, and AIDS was the leading cause of death for black men and the second leading cause for black women in the age group.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 91, Jan 1995, p1-12, il, bibl
Record #:
2303
Abstract:
A survey by the State Center for Health and Environmental Statistics of private sector worksites that offer health promotion activities shows that businesses with 100 or more workers are the most likely to provide such activities.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 92, Mar 1995, p1-27, il, bibl
Subject(s):