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36 results for Wetlands
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Record #:
25217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Various agencies voice their concerns and comments on the Texasgulf request to mine phosphate from several wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 4, Summer 1994, p1-2
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Record #:
2168
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's species of salamanders, frogs, and toads are facing an uncertain future as wetland habitats, which serve as breeding grounds are developed or drained. Approximately fifty percent of the state's permanent wetlands have been destroyed.
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Record #:
25214
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation details its aims with the Environmental Conservation Statement it made regarding Texasgulf’s request to mine in the wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring 1994, p1
Record #:
34177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke University has established a center dedicated to the study of the ecology and management of wetlands. Among the issues to be examined is how to manage wetland ecosystems to sustain functional ecological processes and habitats while allowing compatible development on adjacent landscapes.
Record #:
26634
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thousands of acres of North Carolina pocosin wetlands have been developed without federal permits because the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ruled they are not wetlands. Now the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether state coastal areas proposed for development constitute wetlands.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1987, p8, il
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Record #:
19211
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Abstract:
Farmers have found that the wetlands that lie adjacent to coastal waters yield bountiful crops, but only if the water can be controlled.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 8, Sept 1984, p3-4, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
225
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina ecologists view wetlands as the sustainers of the well-being of coastal waters, while the timber industry, companies such as Weyerhaueser, Union Camp, and Champion International, view wetlands as places for the harvesting and growing of timber.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1992, p10-14, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
2203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Generally, a freshwater marsh is a temporary wetland, existing until filled by sediment washing downstream. During its lifetime, the marsh provides food and shelter for plants and animals and also stores excess water when floods occur.
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Record #:
34205
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Abstract:
According to a recent report by the Water Quality Section of the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management, half of North Carolina’s original coastal wetlands acreage is functionally impaired. The report considers that wetlands impacted by agriculture and urban development are nonsupporting, while those impacted by forestry are partially supporting.
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Record #:
33467
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development are cooperating to produce inventory maps of the state’s coastal wetlands, and the cooperative agreement has been renewed. The maps will classify wetlands by an updated and expanded system which is applicable to all wetlands, not just those that provide habitat for waterfowl.
Record #:
8544
Abstract:
The state's saltwater marshes serve waterfowl as nesting, resting, and feeding sites. Because of the controversies between conservationists and developers over the use of salt marshes, they are better known then freshwater marshes. Freshwater marshes are created by glaciers, river deltas, beaver dams, and manmade projects and are as important as the saltwater ones. They provide homes to countless birds, mammals, invertebrates, fish, reptiles, amphibians, and many kinds of plants.
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Record #:
9705
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Early discusses the state's salt marshes and their importance to sea life and other wildlife, and ultimately man.
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Record #:
34085
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Abstract:
Several studies in North Carolina are exploring the use of wetlands to aid in the removal of nutrients in municipal wastewater. The results of the studies are expected to have important implications for managers who permit discharges from municipal wastewater treatment facilities and package treatment plants.
Record #:
8371
Author(s):
Abstract:
PSC Phosphate, Inc., has applied to the Army Corps of Engineers for a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit to impact and fill wetlands and waters of the state for the purpose of continuing their mining operations along South Creek in eastern Beaufort County. A similar grant that allowed the company to impact over 1,200 acres of wetlands in 1997 resulted in the largest permitted destruction of wetlands in the history of the state. If the new permit is granted, the Pamlico River basin would lose 2,500 acres of high-quality wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 2006, p1, 3, map
Record #:
26421
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to a recent federal district court decision, it will be more difficult for developers to take over forested wetlands. The court held that some clearing activities were in violation of the Clean Water Act.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 1, Jan 1980, p6
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