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24 results for Watershed--Protection
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Record #:
28237
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hog lagoons or cesspools are the disposal method of waste in the hog industry. However, after 2005, there were no supposed to be any more lagoons in use in the state. The lagoons contaminate groundwater and nearby watersheds and Governor Easely made a deal with industry to do away with the lagoons for a better environmentally and economically feasible method. To date, there has not been an agreed-upon economically feasible method, but some are hoping that research will produce one soon.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
34356
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sherry MacQueen, the new source water protection coordinator in the North Carolina Public Water Supply Section, discusses the condition of all public drinking water sources and local partnerships to protect streams, reservoirs, and wells that supply public drinking water systems. MacQueen also discusses assessments of risk to drinking water sources and the state’s Water Supply Watershed Protection program.
Record #:
25274
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Center for Watershed Protection has come up with a review of urban stream research discussing the studies measuring indicators all over the U.S. and gives directions for research on urban streams.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p7
Record #:
25276
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many concerns involving the potential move of Rose Acre Farms to a location withing Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge and near the Alligator River, Swan Quarter and Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 4, Fall 2003, p5
Record #:
34315
Author(s):
Abstract:
In August, President Clinton designated Wilson Creek in Avery and Caldwell counties as a component of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The goal of this designation is to preserve the character of the river, including its free-flowing state. Wilson Creek has been called a whitewater boater’s dream and premier paddling destination.
Record #:
34226
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its March meeting, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission denied a request from the Town of Boiling Springs to reclassify a portion of Sandy Run Creek in Cleveland and Rutherford counties for water supply. It was the first time the commission has denied a request for reclassification to water supply purposes.
Record #:
16881
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation during the 1989 session that entrusted the regulation of minimal environmental standards of watersheds to local governments. The goal of this legislation is to protect surface water supplies from pollution by managing development densities, allowable land use, industrial and residential discharge, and chemical qualities of the water. Since adoption of this legislation, many local governments are turning to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for watershed identification and management.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p66-67, f
Record #:
34212
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its October 8 meeting, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted unanimously to deny a request from environmental groups for a Declaratory Ruling on the validity of the modified water supply watershed protection rules adopted in February 1992. The commission affirmed that the rules were developed and adopted in accordance with procedures required by the Administrative Procedure Act.
Record #:
34189
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Management’s Water Quality Section is preparing to implement a river-basin wide strategy for protecting surface water quality. The strategy will integrate information from water quality and biological monitoring, wastewater discharge permitting, and nonpoint source pollution control efforts to give regulators a complete picture of water quality conditions in each of the state’s river basins.
Record #:
34185
Author(s):
Abstract:
In December, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted minimum rules for classification and protection of surface water supplies, as mandated by the Water Supply Watershed Protection Act passed in 1989. The commission must next reclassify all water supply watersheds in the state, and develop ordinances for local governments.
Record #:
34193
Author(s):
Abstract:
At its May 9 meeting, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission approved holding public hearings on the proposed classifications of water supply watersheds across the state. The classification determines the kinds of protective measures that must be put into place by local governments with jurisdiction in the watershed. The public hearing process gives citizens an opportunity to comment on the proposed classification.
Record #:
34195
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation ratified by the North Carolina General Assembly in July postpones the date by which the Environmental Management Commission must reclassify water supply watersheds and the date by which local governments must submit local water supply ordinances. A summary of the changes is provided in this article.
Record #:
34200
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Commission voted to send to public hearing proposed special designations for water bodies across the state. Proposed watershed protection classifications include Outstanding Resource Waters (ORW), Shellfishing/Outstanding Resource Waters (SA-ORW), or High Quality Waters (HQW).
Record #:
34175
Author(s):
Abstract:
A conference committee of the North Carolina General Assembly convened on May 21 to consider a bill that would allow the Environmental Management Commission additional time to adopt water supply classifications and management requirements and classify all existing watersheds. The legislature also considered bills that would allow the collection of fees to help support state and local environmental services.
Record #:
34172
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted to proceed with public hearings on water supply watershed protection regulations. This article provides a summary and table of the main features of the draft watershed protection regulations and classifications.