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6 results for State spending
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Record #:
17318
Abstract:
Public purchasing often receives attack and criticism, but Nicholson provides ways to increase the power of the tax dollar.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 13 Issue 7, Nov 1947, p5-7
Subject(s):
Record #:
18640
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1982, the state was one of only four without legislative measures against local and state taxation and spending, a trend which began with California's 1978 Proposition 13. The article provides an analysis of both current and historical spending within the state. Nine tables break down statistics specific to how much and where government spending goes and compares these numbers with the nation and other southeastern states.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 48 Issue 2, Fall 1982, p30-41
Record #:
30137
Author(s):
Abstract:
In contrast to the expansion of General Fund expenditures from 1934 to 1949, the basic structure of North Carolina's taxing laws have not changed. Along with the increase in expenditures, revenue bills have been written for debt retirement, permanent improvements, and school house construction.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
30136
Author(s):
Abstract:
1953 will end two decades of of an increase in public revenues, expansion of state services, and public spending. The largest contribution to the expansion of public services and spending has been to public education and other charitable services such as hospitals.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
30162
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Fund covers two large expenditures, parts of which were to services not provided just a decade ago: state aid and obligations and charitable and correctional institutions. Funds to state aid, which include public welfare, physical care, public employee retirement funds, cultural agencies, and other agencies such as fisheries and civilian defense, were over 11% of the budget for 1951. Charitable and correctional institutions, including mental hospitals, tuberculosis sanitariums, children's rehabilitation hospitals, orphanages, and correctional schools, received over 7% of the General Fund appropriations.
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Record #:
30159
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Budget Bureau found that the largest unencumbered surplus since 1948 will carry over for the new fiscal year starting July 1, 1951. Although the General Fund spent over $150,000,000 for general administration, education institutions, charitable and correctional institutions, state aid, pensions, and contingencies, the state also saw revenues from taxes totaling over $176,000,000. This leaves the state with a credit balance of over $17,000,000 for the next fiscal year.
Subject(s):