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15 results for Salamanders--Research
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Record #:
29614
Author(s):
Abstract:
The green salamander is North Carolina’s only endangered amphibian, and occurs in small populations in a few of the state’s southwestern mountain counties. In the past twelve years, most green salamander discoveries can be credited to Alan Cameron, a retiree and volunteer for Wildlife Diversity. Cameron has discovered new salamander sites, observed unreported behaviors and rare pigmentation patterns.
Record #:
28312
Abstract:
The relative abundance of streamside salamanders and the availability of protective cover was assessed at three study sites along Mill Creek in Highlands, Macon County, North Carolina. Area-constrained searches of rocks demonstrated a significant reduction in salamander diversity as a result of severe sedimentation and loss of microhabitat.
Record #:
28255
Abstract:
The leech Oligobdella biannulata is a species endemic to mountain streams of the Southern Blue Ridge Physiographic Zone, and is thought to be host specific to salamanders. Host salamanders were collected in North Carolina and South Carolina, and examined for leeches. Observations revealed a much wider range of salamander hosts than had previously been reported.
Record #:
28264
Abstract:
Terrestrial salamanders are vulnerable to changes in the forest-floor microclimate as a result of canopy thinning by the hemlock woolly adelgid. A study conducted in the Highlands of Macon County, North Carolina concluded that as long as leaf litter remained moist and intact, the long-term impact of canopy thinning will likely be minimal.
Record #:
28166
Abstract:
A survey of streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park revealed low populations of hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) and mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus). Water quality profiles indicated acidic conditions for Little River and Noland Creek, suggesting that monitoring efforts should be continued.
Record #:
30023
Abstract:
Data were collected on populations of six species of salamanders at two locations in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. Although the numbers have fluctuated for various reasons, there has been no trend in the numbers of any of the species.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p59-64, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30024
Abstract:
Comparative descriptive data are provided on variation of egg size in five species of salamanders in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. The species differ in their use of larval habitats.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p71-82, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30080
Abstract:
The genus Necturus is a group of aquatic salamanders commonly known as waterdogs and mudpuppies. Of the three species occurring in North Carolina, only the Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is endemic to the state. In 1978, a three-year study began to provide information on its life history, habitat preference, and preliminary conservation status.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p1-12, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30084
Abstract:
The Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is a large, aquatic salamander endemic to the Neuse and Tar River systems of North Carolina. Some of the streams inhabited by the salamander drain lands subject to frequent pesticide applications. This paper reports the results of analysis of tissues to determine pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residue levels.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p107-109, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30081
Abstract:
The Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is a totally aquatic salamander endemic to the Neuse and Tar River drainages of North Carolina. A study conducted from 1978 through 1980 documented the waterdog’s distribution, ecology and feeding habits. A conservation status of Special Concern may be warranted due the animal’s need for larger streams with relatively clean, flowing water.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p13-35, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30083
Author(s):
Abstract:
Movements, microhabitat selection and home ranges of the Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) were studied in the Little River, Wake and Johnston counties, North Carolina, from 1977 to 1981. The study provides information on the animal’s behavior in both its natural environment and the laboratory.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p83-106, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30082
Abstract:
All salamander species of the genus Necturus are found throughout North Carolina and the coastal plain of southeastern United States. This study examined the degree to which chromosome changes have accompanied diversification and divergence within Necturus, and to elucidate the relationship between the geographic distribution and the evolutionary history of this group of salamanders.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p37-52, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30125
Author(s):
Abstract:
The seepage salamander (Desmognathus aeneus) has been found in the Unicoi Mountains of Tennessee and Nantahala Mountains of North Carolina. It inhabits leaf litter along small streams and seepage areas. This study reports information on the distribution, status, and ecology of the salamander in this region.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 7, July 1982, p95-100, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30141
Abstract:
The Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is an aquatic salamander endemic to the Neuse and Tar River drainages of North Carolina. This study compared electrophoretic data for all three species in the genus Necturus, in an attempt to evaluate the genetics and taxonomic status of Necturus lewisi.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1980, p43-46, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
10004
Abstract:
Populations of the mole salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) have been found in Union and Surry Counties. These are the state's first verified records of this salamander from east of the eastern Continental Divide. Three new locations for the four-toed salamander (Hemidactylium scutatum) have been found in the Coastal Plain.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p135-139, map, bibl Periodical Website
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