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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Rails (Birds)--Coastal areas
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Record #:
6602
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seven species of rails inhabit coastal North Carolina, including the clapper, king, Virginia, and sora. Rails are often called marsh hens because of their salt marsh habitats and chicken-like build and are more easily heard than seen. Of the rails, the clapper is most popular with hunters. Amundson discusses the rail's history, characteristics, nesting, food habits, enemies, and game-bird qualities.
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Record #:
9828
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rails are often called marsh hens because of their salt marsh habitats and chicken-like build. Hunting rails goes back to the 1800s; they are a hard quarry to seek and find and attract only the hardiest of hunters. Wooten describes rail hunting on the Outer Banks and includes several recipes for preparing them for the table.
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Record #:
9870
Author(s):
Abstract:
Six rail species inhabit North Carolina, with the king rail the largest and the black rail the smallest. Earley describes the clapper rail, one of four rails that breed in the state. Rails are often called marsh hens because of their salt marsh habitats and chicken-like build and are more easily heard than seen.
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Record #:
6005
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four rail species live in the state - the clapper, king, Virginia, and sora. Rails are often called marsh hens because of their salt marsh habitats and chicken like build. Hunting rails goes back to the 1800s; they are a hard quarry to seek and find and attract only the hardiest of hunters. Lawrence describes where and how this bird is hunted.
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