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3 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Stoneman's Raid
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Record #:
20837
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Abstract:
This is the second installment of a series examining the little studied final raid upon the South's war resources planned and lead by Union Major-General George Stoneman. Focusing on the raiders' time spent in eastern Tennessee, western North Carolina, and the North Carolina and Virginia Piedmont the author argues that the raid's use of total war tactics and assaults on the civilian population found innocent victims in the people of these regions. The raid also presented the somewhat unique occurrence of pitting Southerners against their own community, in that Stoneman's forces contained many Southern citizens who had sided with the Union cause for reasons specific to this region.
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Record #:
20834
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the first installment of an article examining the little studied final raid upon the South's war resources planned and lead by Union Major-General George Stoneman. Focusing on the raiders' time spent in eastern Tennessee, western North Carolina, and the North Carolina and Virginia Piedmont, the author argues that the raid's use of total war tactics and assaults on the civilian population found innocent victims in these regions. The raid also presented the somewhat unique occurrence of pitting Southerners against their own community, in that Stoneman's forces contained many Southern citizens who sided with the Union cause for reasons specific to this region.
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Record #:
20870
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the third and final installment of a series examining the little studied final raid upon the South's war resources planned and lead by Union Major-General George Stoneman. Focusing on the raiders' time spent in eastern Tennessee, western North Carolina, and the North Carolina and Virginia Piedmont the author argues that the raid's use of total war tactics and assaults on the civilian population found innocent victims in the people of these regions. The raid also presented the somewhat unique occurrence of pitting Southerners against their own community, in that Stoneman's forces contained many Southern citizens who had sided with the Union cause for reasons specific to this region.
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