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3 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Conscription, Confederate
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Record #:
19646
Abstract:
On April 16, 1862 the Confederate Congress passed the first conscription act. Opposition to the policy was strong in North Carolina where intense individualism, a distrust of outside authority, and the most complete enforcement of the conscription laws caused the governor and chief justice to conflict with the confederate policymakers.
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Record #:
21484
Author(s):
Abstract:
A look at the unique circumstances surrounding Confederate conscription in North Carolina during the Civil War. Because North Carolina provided over one-fourth of all conscripts in the Confederate Army and had so many Union sympathizers and a strong peace movement, serious conflict occurred. The most common action in response to conscription was to fight it in court. Because there was no Confederate Supreme Court, cases were sent to North Carolina's judiciary, which was intent on preserving the state's sovereignty, and where the chief justice was sympathetic toward conscripts.
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Record #:
14362
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the Civil War progressed, the Confederacy was faced with a dwindling supply of soldiers. To offset this, the Confederate Congress passed a conscription law, or draft. A section of the law, passed in early 1864, required 17-year-olds and men aged 45 to 50 to join up. The boys were called the Junior Reserves and the men the Senior Reserves.
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