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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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27 results for Insects
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Record #:
36156
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This collection of the top ten photos included categories such as ages of the photographers, plants, landscapes, outdoor recreation, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, and animal behavior. Nearly all of the winners came from towns in North Carolina’s three regions.
Record #:
36199
Author(s):
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This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
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Record #:
36197
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To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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Record #:
36212
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Abstract:
An aspect of exploration that may not be included in history texts is the introduction of living things from other places into the land being explored, such as insects and plants. While they may be harmless, the author places emphasis on those considered invasive, or hitchhikers. The author noted that invasive plants and animals can inflict economic and environmental damage. Examples of invasive insects included Colorado potato beetle and Silverleaf whitefly. As for invasive plants, examples were Emerald ash borer and Crapemyrtle bark scale.
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Record #:
24841
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Adrian Smith presents her knowledge about ants, specifically Western long-legged harvester ants. She describes some general facts about ants as well as facts more specific to her line of study. She presents the findings of research she has done involving orphan ants and what is called the ‘queen’s death mark.’
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Winter 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
25684
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Julie Urban studies desert hoppers, species of plant hoppers that inhabit North American deserts. Since 2010, she has been collecting plant hoppers from around the world and sequencing their DNA in order to reconstruct their evolutionary relationships. Urban hopes to discover the features that allow desert hoppers to inhabit desert environments.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p4-5, il
Record #:
27666
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biology professor, Quent Lupton, describes the Red Velvet Wasp. This type of wasp is known for its large, painful stingers and about 20 species can be found in North Carolina.
Record #:
35428
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Abstract:
Profiled was the North Carolina Museum of Art’s 20th Annual Bugfest, touted by the author as the single largest bug-centric event held in the United States. This article discussed the theme of that year’s event, ants. Also noted was two Museum ant experts and their NCSU colleague’s list of seven favorite ants, which included the Exploding Ant and Indian Jumping Ant.
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Record #:
34612
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many native tropical insect species have counterparts in temperate climates of North America. The Eastern Hercules beetle, the Devil’s mare walking stick, and the Cloudless Sulphur butterfly are all common insects found in North Carolina that are closely related to tropical and desert insects.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 2014, p6-7, il
Record #:
20667
Author(s):
Abstract:
New pests and diseases are coming to the Carolinas. One is the brown marmorated stink bug, a native to Asia, which was introduced in the country in 1998. Two types of scale--the oak lecanium and the gloomy scale--attack oaks and red maples respectively. In June, 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in three state counties--Granville, Person, and Vance. This Asian beetle was first found in southeastern Michigan in 2002 and has since spread to eighteen states. Boxwood blight, found in the state in 2012, attacks American and English boxwoods.
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Record #:
23341
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Abstract:
Numerous threats, such as disease, pests, or fire, have been constant in the daily lives of Pitt County ancestors. There are reports of numerous sicknesses and epidemics over the years. The disease that probably caused the greatest fear was Small Pox. Homeopathic cures and tonics, along with family remedies, have existed for all sorts of ailments, many of which are contained in the East Carolina Manuscript Collection of East Carolina University.
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Record #:
28342
Abstract:
The diversity and seasonal abundance of arthropods (insects and spiders) associated with two old growth and two secondary growth stands of eastern hemlock were assessed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. More arthropods were captured in secondary growth hemlock stands than in old growth stands.
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Record #:
28337
Abstract:
The northern bush katydid (Scudderia septentrionalis) is currently listed by the North Carolina Heritage Program as a significantly rare insect. Surveys for the katydid in western North Carolina were conducted by listening for their unique mating calls. Observations provided estimates of their location and population.
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Record #:
28260
Abstract:
The wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus harbors wood-digesting protists related to those in the guts of termites. The protest symbionts of a population of Cryptocercus from northeast Georgia were examined to determine if species-specific bacteria are associated with the protists.
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Record #:
26005
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Abstract:
Kyle Hedlund is an associate professor of computer science with an interest in insect biology. To merge his two passions, Hedlund created an online catalog of North American ants.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 2004, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
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