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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Highways
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Record #:
29239
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina State Secretary of Transportation Thomas J. Harrelson is dispelling myths about the state's Highway Fund and Highway Trust Fund, and the Department of Transportation, including funding cuts, programming constraints, and projects.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 7, July 1991, p22-27, il, por
Record #:
30553
Author(s):
Abstract:
Started in 1935, the North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program was based on a similar program in VA. After forty tears, cuts to the funding of the project could threaten the quality and effectiveness of the program.
Source:
Record #:
30488
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's new motor routes are making the spring and summer vacation lands from the mountains to the coast more accessible than ever. Major highway improvements and additional roads, along with new attractions such as museums at Cape Hatteras, the 18th century village at Old Salem, and access to Fontana Lake provide tourists with historical, scientific, educational, and recreational activities.
Record #:
12985
Author(s):
Abstract:
Adopt-A-Highway is the North Carolina Department of Transportation's program to improve highway cleanliness. Under the plan businesses volunteer to adopt a two-mile stretch of highway and keep it litter free. In just over a year, one thousand businesses have signed up. The state puts up an Adopt A Highway sign with the name of the business keeping that particular stretch clean underneath it. First Citizens Banks leads the program with over 300 miles adopted.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
30759
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1935, the NC General Assembly authorized the NC Highway Historical Marker Program, modeled after a similar program in Virginia. The state’s first marker was dedicated in 1936 in Granville County for the home site of John Penn, one of NC’s three signers of the Declaration of Independence. In its fiftieth year, the program boasts nearly 1,250 markers around the state.
Source:
Record #:
24553
Author(s):
Abstract:
The King’s Highway designated a strip of road in colonial eastern North Carolina that parallels modern U.S. 17. It was the road that most travelers took to travel through North Carolina. This article presents what it was like to travel on this road in pre-Revolutionary times.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 7, December 1973, p9-11, il
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