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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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23 results for Elections
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Record #:
127
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former Charlotte mayor, Harvey Gantt, and Duke history professor, Lawrence Goodwyn, discuss the Democrats' chances in the 1992 elections.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Jan 1992, p10-12, por Periodical Website
Record #:
39772
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sixty-six percent of North Carolina’s voters live in areas such as small towns and rural communities, translating into a substantial impact on elections across the state.
Record #:
31369
Author(s):
Abstract:
Balloting for the 1984 election campaign begins on November 6. North Carolina voters will cast ballots in the race for president while choosing their representatives to serve in the Governor’s Mansion, the United States Senate and various state and local government posts. This article presents biographical profiles of the candidates, and their views on legislation for rural electric cooperatives.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 10, Oct 1984, p18-24, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
11777
Abstract:
United States Senator Jesse Helms and challenger John R. Ingram are discussed in this pre-election profile
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 36 Issue 10, Oct 1978, p13, 45-46, por
Record #:
31485
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina voters will go to the polls November 2 to elect their first representatives to Congress under a new alignment of Congressional districts. This article provides biographies of the candidates, and their perspectives on the rural economy and unemployment.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 14 Issue 10, Oct 1982, p8-15, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
20956
Author(s):
Abstract:
State-wide gun control laws have superseded municipalities' ability to regulate concealment laws. Morrisville Mayor Jackie Holcombe disagrees with this state-wide statue allowing concealed guns on municipal property such as parks and playgrounds. Holcombe's mayoral opponents, Mark Stohlman and Narendra Singh, voiced their opinions about gun control as well.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 43, Oct 2013, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
27784
Abstract:
Clarence Bender, a Democratic state Senate candidate from Nash County ran for election from a prison cell. Bender was arrested on the first day of early voting for allegedly selling drugs to an undercover police officer. Bender’s history and experience as a local politician is explored. Currently a town commissioner in Castalia, NC, Bender has been described by several as a con-man and by others as a well-respected leader in the community.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 47, November 2012, ponline Periodical Website
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Record #:
28831
Abstract:
Four North Carolina candidates in the 2016 election are profiled, discussing their perspectives of various issues. The candidates are Republican T. Greg Doucette, Durham activist Lamont Lily, Thomas Mills, and Gary Johnson. Although it is unlikely that they will win, each candidate has a critical message.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 42, Nov 2016, p10-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
12000
Abstract:
Jackson F. Lee of Fayetteville was elected chairman of the State Republican Party in 1977 and reelected in 1979. He discusses the Republican Party's chances in the upcoming election in a state where Democrats outnumber Republicans three to one.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 38 Issue 10, Oct 1980, p35, 51-52, por
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Record #:
11999
Abstract:
Russell Walker, chairman of the State Democratic Party, discusses the upcoming election, including the duties of a party chairman, allowing a third party candidate on the ballot, and how well President Carter will do in North Carolina.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 38 Issue 10, Oct 1980, p34, 49-50, por
Record #:
27500
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the 1990 elections near, the race that could have the most direct impact on citizens is the open NC Supreme Court Seat. Of the 6 nominated candidates, all are well-respected, but questions arise about Samuel Currin. Currin, a former aide to US Senator Jesse Helms, is criticized by attorneys and legal observers for his seeming lack of knowledge of the law and questionable ethics. Currin had a previous federal judgeship blocked through a bi-partisan effort.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 42, October 24-31 1990, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
30587
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Mildenberg takes a look at the two state treasurer candidates for the 2016 election, Democrat Dan Blue III and republican Dale Folwell.
Record #:
20955
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three Apex City Council seats will be filled after the November 5th election in Wake County. The two Democratic candidates, Jennifer Ferrel and Nicole Dozier, are introduced to readers and the author looks at these local elections to predict state-wide elections and replacing the Republican dominated legislature.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 42, Oct 2013, p17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
11590
Abstract:
The nine Republican and Democrat candidates for Governor present their views on state transportation policy. The Democrat candidates are Andy Barker, Jim Hunt, Ed O'Herron, Tom Strickland, and George Wood. Republican candidates are Jake Alexander, Dave Flaherty, Wallace McCall and Coy Privette.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 1976, p20-21, 23-24, 88, por
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Record #:
16197
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1892, the Populist and Republican parties joined to oppose the firmly rooted Democratic Party. This merger forced many Democrats from office and, in the 1898 election, the white supremacy Democratic platform led to a violent mob in Wilmington.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 41 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p26-29, il