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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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18 results for Business enterprises
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Record #:
2343
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's seventy-five largest public companies range from banks to transport companies to makers of collecting cards. However, most of the market value is concentrated in the state's financial institutions - banks, thrifts, and brokerages.
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Record #:
4232
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's top seventy-five public companies are ranked by their May 1999 market value. Bank of America, First Union, and Duke Energy retained their first, second, and third rankings. RF Micro Devices made the biggest jump, moving from Number 59 to 19.
Record #:
4294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using 1998 revenues, the Arthur Anderson Accounting Firm ranked the state's top 100 private companies for Business North Carolina. Fifty-six percent of the companies are family-owned. General Parts, Inc. of Raleigh and Parkdale Mills, Inc. of Gastonia retained their 1998 rankings of first and second. Rodgers Builders, Inc. of Charlotte made the biggest jump, moving from ninety-first to thirty-eighth.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 19 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p36-37, 39, 41, 43, 45-49, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5194
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using 2000 revenues, the Arthur Anderson Accounting Firm ranked the state's top 100 private companies for Business North Carolina. All companies listed had revenues greater than $50 million. On 1999's listing, 11 companies had less. Companies reporting of over $500 million increased from six to seven in 2000.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 21 Issue 10, Oct 2001, p24-25,27-29,31,33,35, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5459
Abstract:
Using 2001 revenues, the Grant Thornton Accounting Firm ranked the state's 100 private companies for BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA. Companies doing business mainly in finance, real estate, retail, or healthcare do not qualify for the list. Twenty-one companies made their first appearance or returned after at least one year's absence. General Parts, Inc., of Raleigh, a distributor of replacement parts for vehicles, retained its No. 1 ranking from 2001.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 22 Issue 10, Oct 2002, p45, 47, 49, 51-53, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using 2003 revenues, the Grant Thornton Accounting Firm ranked the state's 100 private companies for BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA. General Parts, Inc., of Raleigh, a distributor of replacement parts for vehicles, retained its No. 1 ranking from 2003. Manufacturers hold twenty-seven positions on the 2004 list, and these companies contribute 31 percent of the revenue. Two textile companies and a furniture manufacturer hold three of the list's top seven positions.
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Record #:
7424
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using 2004 revenues, the Grant Thornton Accounting Firm ranked the state's top 100 private companies for BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA. Participation by companies is voluntary. Distribution and manufacturing companies continue to dominate the list. Five of the top ten companies that grossed in excess of $500 million were manufacturers. Two of the top ten were distributors. General Parts, Inc., of Raleigh, a distributor of replacement parts for vehicles, retained its No. 1 ranking from 2004.
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Record #:
13307
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Carl and James Maynard founded their first steakhouse in Fayetteville in 1973. A success from the start, Golden Corral is now one of the country's 100 fastest-growing private companies in the country.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 2 Issue 5, May 1982, p24-25, 27-28, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
13685
Author(s):
Abstract:
Arthur Anderson ranks North Carolina's largest private companies. McDevitt & Street Co., a Charlotte general contractor, held the top ranking.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 10 Issue 6, June 1990, p22-23, 25, 27-34, 37, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24299
Abstract:
David Womick is CEO of Redneck Foods Inc. and planned to create a coast-to-coast barbecue restaurant chain. He is struggling to realize his dream, however, because of lack of funds. This article discusses the trials and tribulations of opening a business.
Record #:
24359
Author(s):
Abstract:
Volodia Prigozhin ventured to create an enterprise on Soviet soil be selling North Carolina-made elastic bandages. Unfortunately, U.S.S.R. bureaucrats were uninterested and the business venture failed.
Record #:
24397
Abstract:
This article highlights numerous individuals in North Carolina who make money speaking at events, schools, churches, and businesses.
Subject(s):
Record #:
24410
Abstract:
This article discusses the difficulties of opening a small business and presents a number of important steps to consider, such as having a good accountant, lawyer, and bank.
Record #:
25915
Author(s):
Abstract:
Small companies in North Carolina are finding niche markets where know-how and flexibility mean more than large-scale production. UNC experts advise local companies to build on strengths, develop a network of interdependent businesses, and invest in university-based research that leads to new technologies.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Spring 2005, p9-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22536
Abstract:
Brendan Sherar is the developer of Biblio.com, an Asheville-based online marketplace for books. Now the third-largest company of its kind, the website sells and buys used, rare, out of print, and text books.