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4 results for Bridges--Pitt County
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Record #:
23442
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old steel bridge that is soon to be reconstructed on the Town Common used to be located on Greene Street and was dedicated to World War I veterans in 1929. Work began on the bridge in 1927 and was completed two years later at a cost of $150,000. Bronze plaques were placed at each end of the bridge and they state that the bridge was dedicated on June 21, 1929 (even though the dedication date was actually April 27, 1929). Many townspeople attended the dedication ceremony.
Record #:
23712
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new high Grimesland Bridge takes motorists above the old bridge and over one of the most historic spots on the Tar River. The site of the bridge is where the English settled as early as 1714 known as “Mount Calvert.” It was here in the 1750’s that Edward Salter established a ferry across the Tar River and in 1764 that the Royal Post Road between Williamsburg, VA and Charleston, SC passed through Pitt County and crossed the river on Salter’s Ferry. Salter’s Ferry afterwards was known as “Watkin’s Ferry” and much later as “Boyd’s Ferry.” In 1892, there was a push to put a ferry at Yankee Hall. In 1914, a wooden drawbridge was built across the Tar River at Boyd’s Ferry. The draw was the former draw at Beaufort, NC and was brought up the river by barge. The wooden bridge was rebuilt in 1926. A new concrete bridge was built in 1953/54 about 1200 feet from the old wooden bridge. The new high bridge over the river was dedicated on March 30, 2011 in honor of L. Elmore Hodges and opened for traffic on Monday, May 14, 2011.
Record #:
23720
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bridging the Tar River has been a long and arduous process in Pitt County. A free ferry was established over the Tar River at Greenville in 1787 and the first bridge was built over the river about 1823. The next bridge was built in 1848 by Samuel Marshburn. During the Civil War there were several attempts by the Yankees to burn the bridge at Greenville. The bridge was washed away or damaged in the Great Flood of June 1867. In 1879, a new bridge with a drawbridge was constructed and proclaimed the largest wooden bridge in North Carolina, being a few feet of six hundred yards. In 1907, a new steel bridge was built on Pitt Street across the river. In 1927/28, a new steel bridge was built on Greene Street to replace the older one on Pitt Street. With great foresight and a hard fought battle this last steel bridge, one of the very few left in North Carolina, was preserved and now graces the Town Common.
Record #:
22904
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1800s, bridges were the major lifelines to other parts of the county. Quicker than ferries or swimming, bridges served to link different communities separated by the Tar River. By 1830, Greenville finally got a bridge to span the Tar. The bridge was wooden and could not last very long with all the horse traffic. In the 1880s alone, the bridges were known to receive many repairs. By 1900, these bridges were in poor condition, as the included photograph illustrates. However, with the increased production of steel, Pitt County gained several steel bridges. In 1907, a steel drawbridge was constructed on Pitt Street. In 1928, a new bridge was erected at Greene Street.