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7 results for Boating accidents
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Record #:
25964
Author(s):
Abstract:
Boating accident reports received by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s Division of Motorboats and Water Safety how shown a decline in accidents from 1972 to 1973. However, concerns are still high as most of the reported accidents could be eliminated with the use of safety equipment and education.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 4, Sept-Oct 1974, p10
Subject(s):
Record #:
26464
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent study by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission on boating accidents shows that alcohol consumption was a large contributing factor.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 7, Jul 1980, p4
Subject(s):
Record #:
26544
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although early spring offers some of the best fishing in North Carolina, it also provides some of the most dangerous conditions for boaters and recreationists. Cool waters can lead to hypothermia which can lead quickly to death.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 11, Nov 1980, p12
Record #:
26540
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although 38 percent of boating accidents in North Carolina last year involved drinking, there is no specific definition of a legal blood alcohol level for boating as there is for driving.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 11, Nov 1980, p8, 9
Subject(s):
Record #:
6684
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recently completed boating survey shows that although the total number of boating accidents in the state was up slightly in 1961, the number of accidents occurring while the operators were fishing was reduced from 21 percent to 2 percent. This marked reduction may reflect a growing awareness that as the waterways become more crowded, more attention must be given to water safety. Arrington discusses when and where boating accidents happened in 1961; what the boat operators were doing and their age and experience; causes of the accidents; and what can be done to improve safety.
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Record #:
6768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Statistics on boating accidents were compiled for the first time in 1960. That year 79 boating accidents were reported, with 37 fatalities. In 1963, there were 68 reported accidents, and fatalities had dropped to 26. This marked reduction may reflect a growing awareness that as the waterways become more crowded, more attention must be given to water safety. Raver discusses the time of day when accidents happened; bodies of water where accidents happened, such as lakes, rivers, and ponds; size of the boat; and what the boat operator was doing.
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Record #:
6783
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Boating Act of 1959 “requires that all boating accidents occurring on public waters and fitting the reporting criteria of the act be reported to the Wildlife Resources Commission.” There were forty-four fatalities in 1964, and the number of accidents totaled eighty-eight. Over half of the accidents for which causes were determined were the result of collision with another vessel or capsizing. A map of the state provides locations of nonfatal and fatal boating accidents.
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