NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


37 results for Asheville--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
22715
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East End/Valley Street neighborhood and the Nasty Branch Creek fostered a collective identity for the black public in Asheville, North Carolina in the 1950s-1970s. In the face of urban renewal, this neighborhood and surrounding environment provided economic opportunities and social networks.
Source:
Record #:
24003
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24102
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the history of opera houses in America and the opening of Asheville's Grand Opera House in 1890.
Record #:
23633
Abstract:
In the late 1800s, Asheville was home to a thriving community of Jewish store owners, who helped to shape the city into a thriving business center seen today. Clausen discusses some of the more prominent members of the time, including Solomon Lipinsky, a keen businessman and town leader.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
23803
Author(s):
Abstract:
WNC Magazine presents two-hundred years of growth in Asheville, North Carolina with special attention paid to the cityscape and historic structures, as well as past important events that took place in the city.
Subject(s):
Record #:
24024
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author traces various artistic interpretations of Western North Carolina's landscapes since the 18th century, focusing primarily on William Bartram, who traveled throughout the area in 1775. The painter and botanist observed customs and traditions of the Cherokee, publishing his accounts as 'Travels' in 1791.
Record #:
24112
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the history of fire trucks in Asheville, from horse drawn apparatuses to the trucks we see today.
Record #:
13443
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville's new and unusual visitor attraction, the Colburn Mineral Museum, was started with the collection of the late Burnham S. Colburn totaling over 500 pieces. Now housing more than 2,000 minerals, the collection features many stones native to North Carolina, including Hiddenite, a rare mineral found only in Alexandria County. Among the oddities of stones is a piece of flexible sandstone able to bend at an angle.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p28-29
Full Text:
Record #:
24592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Paul Ayers Rockwell, who resided in Asheville, North Carolina, came from a warrior family and served in three wars for France. This article discusses the history and accomplishments of this decorated solider.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 6, August 1966, p11-12, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
22144
Abstract:
Quoting from the writings of two men connected closely with the city--Thomas Wolfe, a native, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, a visitor, Kruse captures the feel of Asheville during a period of American excess--the 1920s--followed by the crash of the 1930s.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p92-96, 98, 100, 102, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29715
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Willis Pack came to Asheville in 1884 for its healthful climate, and discovered the area was a prime location for growth. Over the next twenty years, he donated money to develop the downtown and surrounding areas.
Full Text:
Record #:
24105
Abstract:
The author discusses white water rafting in Asheville and talks about the history of French Broad Rafting Expeditions, the oldest rafting company in the area.
Record #:
24085
Author(s):
Abstract:
The building that houses Grove Arcade is a historical icon in Asheville and first opened in 1929. The Grove Arcade was opened by Wiley Grove (1850-1927), who made his fortune initially by selling 'Grove's tasteless Chill Tonic.'
Record #:
24097
Abstract:
Hearn's Cycling and Fitness is a popular store for bicycling equipment and a meetup for cycling enthusiasts. Opened in 1896, the store is the oldest business in Asheville and the oldest continuously-run bicycle shop in the nation.
Source:
Record #:
27319
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hood Tours explore Asheville’s African-American history in the areas of arts, environmentalism, and entrepreneurship. The educational experience covers both past and present African-American history with particular attention given to E.W. Pearson (1906-1946) who was a prominent historical figure in Asheville.