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Record #:
23472
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1982, David Lawrence Morrill of Falkland had in his living room a prized antique rocking chair. The story of this chair goes back to the late 18th Century, when Morrill's ancestor, Rev. Issac Morrill of Massachusetts, purchased it; it has stayed in the family ever since. According to family legend, the Marquis de Lafayette, while in the home of Governor David Morrill of New Hampshire, sat in this chair in 1824 during his tour of the United States. In 1877, following the death of the governor, his widow moved to Marlboro, N.C., now part of Farmville, to be near her two sons, William Henry Morrill and Dr. Samuel Morrill. In this way the chair was eventually handed down to David Lawrence Morrill of Falkland, where it hopefully still resides.
Subject(s):
Record #:
22934
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tucker family owned a flax wheel made by Charles Tull in 1788 and the McLawhorn family owned old counterpanes and shawls made by Betsy English in 1845. The Tugwell family owned a 100 year old gourd that a child could sit in. A local newspaperman, Henry T. King amassed numerous historical articles and several strange pieces of memorabilia. Mrs. Charles McLawhorn owned a miniature hand carved high-back chair carved about 1860 by Greene Letchworth. During World War II scrap drives, many citizens contributed firearms and other historical artifacts for the war effort. In 1961, at the Bicentennial Exhibition at the Greenville Art Center, numerous local relics were on display, including “Lafayette’s Chair” and Gen Bryan Grimes’ clothes.