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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Agriculture
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Record #:
38216
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Abstract:
The promise of better food through science was recognized in two initiatives promising to generate growth in jobs, markets for farmers, and manufacturing. One was the Plant Sciences Initiative, the other the Food Processing Innovation Center. Collectively, they promised to produce greater crop numbers, pioneer crop varieties, and lower farm animals’ feed expense. Collectively, they may also help to assure the supply of food needed to feed the world’s population, projected to be 9.6 billion by 2050.
Record #:
36582
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Also known as “dragon lines” or “fairy lines,” ley lines lie around many of the world’s wonders, such as the Pyramids of Giza. Asheville, falling within ley lines, is believed to have the power arising from high frequency vibrations in strong magnetic fields. Recent research draws the same conclusion as ancient civilizations: ley lines impact fertility, agriculture, mood, memory, and perception for humans and animals alike.
Record #:
27288
Abstract:
People have attempted farming in the Mountains for North Carolina for years. This series of articles highlights different farms in the mountains and different crops, including herbs, apples, carrots, and livestock.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p166-168, 170,172,174-180, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29706
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The Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians has the oldest living agricultural tradition in southern Appalachia, and saving seeds is an important part of their food ways. Some of the families in North Carolina who still save seed and grow Cherokee vegetable varieties are the Bradley Farm in Big Cove, and the Long Family Farm and Gallery in Murphy.
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Record #:
36563
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Traditionally, lands unfenced meant lands were free for anyone, owners and not, to use for hunting, fishing, and grazing. The Civil War, with its attendant population growth and rise of commercial farming, helped to bring about fencing laws and end to open range. Pictured was the type of fence that dotted the Appalachian landscape by the 1890s.
Record #:
36559
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Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.
Record #:
36276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The silent killer for decades in the farming industry is nematodes. Possibly ridding plants of this microscopic roundworm by 2020 is the root knot nematode experiment. This research project, backed by the Gates Foundation, is being undertaken by AgBiome, a biochemical company in Durham.
Record #:
36576
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Abstract:
Mounds built by Native Americans, like the ones featured in the accompanying photo, had purposes both prosaic and sacred. Places like Franklin, Bryson City, Murphy have earthen mounds intact, despite the effects of erosion, plowing, and artifact hunters.
Record #:
10187
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Abstract:
Although North Carolina is known for textiles, furniture, and biotechnology, agriculture remains the state's number one industry, accounting for $68 billion annually. However, since 1990, over a million acres of forest and farms have been lost, mostly to development, and in 2005, over 1,000 farms were lost, the most in any state. To preserve what is left the state is working on projects to help make farming more profitable.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 6, June 2008, p20-22, 24, 26, il
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Record #:
23657
Abstract:
Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa successfully runs an agricultural and livestock business and teaches students how to manage a farm.
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Record #:
7989
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Agriculture is the state's top industry, and through the years a number of men and women have been pioneers in the science and art of agriculture and have served as leaders and ambassadors of the agricultural community. The North Carolina Agricultural Hall of Fame, created in 1953, honors the accomplishments of thirty-three men and women. Members include Leonidas L. Polk, Jane S. McKimmon, W. Kerr Scott, Benjamin W. Kilgore, and Ruth A. Current.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p82-84, 86, 88, 90, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8298
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Dr. Mike Boyette, an agricultural engineer, has been on the faculty at North Carolina State University for twenty-three years. He is an inventor and designer who works to create better farm equipment, structures, and processes. Shore describes some of his inventions.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p16-17, il
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Record #:
4444
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Abstract:
Falling commodity prices, drought, hurricanes, floods, and criticism of tobacco nationwide made 1999 a tough year for farmers. Only one-fourth of the state's farmland escaped Hurricane Floyd's flooding. The cotton crop sustained a $140 million loss, and half the sweet potato crop was lost. Worse yet, the state estimates that 10 to 15 percent of the 55,000 farmers will quit in 2000.
Record #:
206
Abstract:
This entire issue deals with agricultural predictions for 1992.
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