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4 results for African American children--Education
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Record #:
5902
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through funds provided by philanthropist Julius Rosenwald to improve African American education, 5,300 Rosenwald schools were built in rural areas of 15 Southern states between 1917 and 1932. North Carolina built the most with over 830. Many have fallen into ruin. An effort is now underway \"to find, identify, and record the location of these schools before the structures disappear altogether.\"
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Record #:
6859
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1926, a school was raised in a black community near the town of Wake Forest in Wake County. The school was one of 813 Rosenwald Schools built in North Carolina and was named for its first principal, W. M. McElrath. Goebel describes the construction of the school and the classroom activities after it opened. The school integrated in 1970, and it closed in 1989, when a new school was built nearby. In 1998, an association spearheaded by former students purchased the building, with the intent of restoring it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p120-122, 125-126, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7209
Abstract:
The North Carolina Association of Educators recognized the efforts of the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office and North Carolina's Rosenwald Schools Community Project to preserve the heritage of the schools. These schools for African American children were funded by matching grants provided by Chicago philanthropist Julius Rosenwald to African American communities that raised a certain amount of money. Between the late 1910s and 1932, there were 813 of the Rosenwald schools built in North Carolina, more than in any other state. Over 120 of the schools are still standing today.
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Record #:
22389
Abstract:
The Russell Rosenwald School, built between Rougemont and Durham in the 1920s, served children in the African American community. It was one of 813 built in NC, the most in any state. It has been restored and is owned by the neighboring Cain's Chapel Missionary Baptist Church of Durham. The church makes the historic school building available as a community building.
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