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4 results for "Yadkin River"
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Record #:
28063
Author(s):
Abstract:
For 50 years, Alcoa has controlled parts of the Yadkin River building dams to power its smelting plant in Stanly County. Now, Governor Perdue and concerned citizens are trying to take control of the river back from the company since the plant is closed. Alcoa wants to renew its operating license. Critics of Alcoa say the company has polluted the river, doing nothing to address water quality or the economic or recreational needs of the region. Details of how the state is fighting Alcoa, including filing complaints with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission against the company and a bill to create they Yadkin River Trust Authority to assume Alcoa’s license. Alcoa’s dams are worth billions of dollars and the company is fighting the measures.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 46, November 2009, p16-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
35880
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fashion often comes back around, Ray proved, albeit not through discussing clothing styles. This fashion was a water-borne sport. The appeal of it was asserted through casual attire and inexpensive equipment, an inner tube. Adding to the allure were plenteous places to indulge in the sport, such as Green, Broad, Yadkin, Catawba, and Little Tennessee Rivers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p51, 63
Record #:
31647
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edwin Atkinson’s persistence has resulted in the erection of a temporary bridge over the Yadkin River at Siloam. The original bridge collapsed on February 23, killing Atkinson’s parents and two other people. With the support of state and federal officials, Atkinson’s request was fulfilled.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 8, Aug 1975, p20-21, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
13737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Do you remember Allenton? The promised canal never came, but the lake did, and covered the town forever.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 33, Jan 1952, p6
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