NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


64 results for "Water supply"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 5
Next
Record #:
28357
Author(s):
Abstract:
The citizens of the Triangle area are flunking the water conservation test as the drought goes on. Most of the state and city leaders are failing citizens too. Soon, all residents will have no choice but deal with involuntary water cutbacks if the trends continue. This is the time for leaders and citizens step up and to work together to preserve what water is left.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 51, December 2007, p14-15 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
29077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Water levels are declining in North Carolina’s rivers and streams due to increased development and water withdrawals, as well as climate change. The biggest concerns are over the availability of drinking water and pollution. Environmentalists say the state should toughen the requirements on permits for withdrawals to reflect the lower water flow.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p8, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29534
Author(s):
Abstract:
For nearly two decades, the question of a relationship between health and the mineral content of water has been cause for epidemiological studies. This study addressed this question in North Carolina while examining elevation, water constituents, and other environmental and socioeconomic factors that might be affecting death rates.
Source:
PHSB Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 3, Apr 1977, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
31299
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bottled water has become a trend among North Carolina consumers, and stirred several Tar Heel businesses to enter the market with their own brands of bottled water. Several producers are bottling water from North Carolina’s mountain springs. In all there are about ten distributors of spring water across the state.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Mar 1989, p38, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
31362
Author(s):
Abstract:
A task force at North Carolina State University has identified more than a dozen ways in which science education can help citizens stretch and protect water supplies. They urged that more consideration be given to irrigating crops with wastewater, and that continued efforts be made to reduce water usage in the pulp, paper and food processing industries.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 8, Aug 1984, p10-11, il
Record #:
34326
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Drought Monitoring Council report for March 5, 2001 said that extreme drought conditions persist over the western region of North Carolina and that numerous water systems are still dealing with below normal water supplies. The council said that only limited improvements in water supply conditions may occur over the next several months and that water systems whose reservoirs do not refill by April are advised to plan for limited water supplies during the summer months.
Subject(s):
Record #:
33165
Author(s):
Abstract:
The provision of water supplies of ample quantity and quality to sustain population growth and economic development can no longer be taken for granted. North Carolina is experiencing interstate competition for water, and a more active state role in planning for water supplies is in order.
Record #:
33175
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a limited number of sites suitable for the development of water supply reservoirs. Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are assessing the threat of urbanization to future water supply reservoir sites and watersheds.
Record #:
33185
Author(s):
Abstract:
Uncertainties about the use of Jordan Lake as a public water supply remain strong. Of major concern are toxic substances from industries and farms in the watershed. A recent report from the North Carolina Division of Environmental Management examines the suitability of Jordan Lake as a water resource, and lists eight main sources of toxicants in the watershed.
Record #:
33293
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey’s second annual National Water Summary released this summer is dedicated to state ground water data. The North Carolina section shows maps and tables of aquifers and major areas of ground water withdrawals. The report also reviews the most significant hydrologic and water-related events of 1984.
Record #:
33292
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources estimates that almost three-hundred-million gallons of water are being saved each year through leak detection measures being used by local water supply systems in North Carolina. A recent report shows that the leak detection program has saved over two-hundred-thousand dollars since 1983.
Record #:
33294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forty-six community water systems monitored by the North Carolina Division of Health Services have naturally occurring levels of radium high enough to violate drinking water standards for groundwater supplies. Operators of these non-compliant water systems must develop a remedial action plan to bring the water supply into compliance with regulatory standards. Several options are discussed in this article.
Record #:
33343
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thirty North Carolina communities have expressed a desire to pursue a more protected water supply classification under the new system adopted by the Environmental Management Commission in December. The new system gives greater attention to reducing chemical contaminants that may be the source of chronic diseases. It also increases the level of activity by local governments.
Record #:
33361
Author(s):
Abstract:
As temperatures hovered in the mid-nineties and dry conditions continued over most of North Carolina in July, electric utilities strained to meet demand and water authorities in many locations instituted mandatory conservation measures. This article discusses reports from electric companies and typical conservation measures to deal with water shortages.
Record #:
33358
Author(s):
Abstract:
Speaking before the Water Resources Congress in June, Secretary S. Thomas Rhodes, North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, described some of the major water resource management issues in North Carolina. Among the issues are protection of water supply watersheds, coastal water quality, and financing wastewater treatment facilities.