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31 results for "Vance, Zebulon Baird, 1830-1894"
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Record #:
20320
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Abstract:
In the U.S. Senate Chamber on January 19, 1895, Senator Matt W. Ransom delivered a eulogy on the death of Senator Zebulon B. Vance. Vance had been Colonel of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops in the early part of the Civil War and later the wartime Governor of North Carolina. The speech was long and the editors have deleted a few paragraphs, but they indicated that it does not detract from the overall oration.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 16, Sept 1944, p1-2, 24-25
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Record #:
20531
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This is a reprint of a paper presented at the fifty-second annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December, 1952. This biographical essay looks as the personality and character of popular North Carolina governor Zebulon Baird Vance. A black and white photograph of Vance is included.
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Record #:
20625
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Zebulon Baird Vance is remembered as a great Civil War soldier and governor, as well as a great statesman. Allhands examines another side of his character--his sense of humor which made him a big favorite with all whom he came in contact.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 33, Jan 1946, p1, 22
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Record #:
21175
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This article looks at North Carolina Governer Zebulon B. Vance's opposition to the Farmers' Alliance planned subtreasury in 1890, which put his Senate seat at risk and caused conflict within North Carolina Democratic Party politics. The Democrats were split on the issue - the farmers favored the subtreasury plan, conservatives opposed it as government intervention.
Record #:
21646
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This article examines Zebulon B. Vance's re-election campaign for governor of North Carolina during the Civil War in 1864. Vance was originally against Southern succession but by 1864 he was convinced that the Confederate cause was necessary for the continuation of the Southern way of life. His campaign was built around his commitment to Confederate nationalism and ultimately he was successful in his reelection.
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Record #:
21829
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This article examines the debate over whether to emancipate and arm Southern slaves to fight for the Confederacy during the Civil War. The perspective of Governor Zebulon B. Vance is given particular attention, along with the attitudes of North Carolinians towards slaves during the war, and to emancipated blacks after the war.
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Record #:
21870
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This article discusses and examines Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina's governor during the Civil War, and his defense for the state's secession and his own actions as governor. Vance's defense hinged on a reluctant North Carolina being pressured by outside forces and his own sense of duty that caused him to support the Confederacy. This line of reasoning boosted Vance into a successful political career.
Record #:
24072
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Vance Monument pays tribute to Zebulon Vance (1830-1894), the governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. Vance was also later a United States Senator.
Record #:
16071
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Parties clashed in the 1876 gubernatorial race and pitted Democrat Zebulon Vance against Republican Thomas Settle. The race became dubbed 'Battle of the Giants' because each candidate represented the best from each party and because of the veracity of the campaign, which turned away from issues and focused on personalities. Vance would go on to win by 14,000 votes and secure the Democrats political position within the state.
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Record #:
4891
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Zebulon B. Vance was governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. He commanded the Twenty-sixth Regiment of North Carolina Troops at the battles of New Bern and Malvern Hill, prior to his election in 1862. He was an ardent nationalist and supported the Confederacy to the war's end. It was this steadfastness to the state that won him reelection in 1864 over peace candidate William W. Holden. Vance was again elected governor from 1877 to 1879 and then served as a U.S. Senator till his death in 1894.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p21-23, il
Record #:
30550
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The Documentary Volumes published by the Division of Archives and History are a collection of writings by notable North Carolina citizens and politicians. The origin of this series dates to a 1903 law that created the North Carolina Historical Commission, and tasked it with collecting valuable NC historical documents.
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Record #:
36567
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A Cleveland, Ohio native made an impact on the town that prompted his self-identification as an “Ashevillian.” How his influence continues is through philanthropic contributions to the city. Those noted include the Asheville Public Library, Vance monument, and Montford Residential Park. Such endeavors generated the city’s nods to his name such as Pack Square.
Record #:
37894
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This battle's carnage is measured in more than Union and Confederate casualties. Included by the author were the destruction of the 26th North Carolina Regiment as a formidable force. Attesting to Gettysburg’s destruction included 28,000 Confederate dead or wounded, 2,935 of whom were buried in Virginia’s Hollywood Cemetery. The large number of North Carolina soldiers killed, one in four of total forces, helped to usher in a peace movement yielding 100 rallies and increased division between the Secessionists and Unionists.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p132-134, 136-140 Periodical Website
Record #:
41093
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From free turnip seed, the tie-breaking ballot for building new courthouse was cast. From being built in Lapland, Zebulon Vance predicted the new courthouse would flourish. With a few years, Lapland was renamed Marshall, and a third courthouse was built. Today, the town renamed for a chief justice and its symbol of justice testify to Vance’s vision.