NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


63 results for "Textile industry"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 5
Next
Record #:
29156
Abstract:
In the height of textile production in the 1940s, company towns--towns within towns--housed thousands of workers and their families. For many of the children that grew up in Cone Mill Villages, White Oak, or Proximity Print Works, the experiences within these mill villages offer sweet memories.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p156-158, 160, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27302
Author(s):
Abstract:
Valdese Weavers near Charlotte, North Carolina have been in the textile business for over a century. The employees still learn how to weave, a process that takes years to master.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
40020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along with education, ECU is making a difference in fields such as medicine, life sciences, engineering, technology, and business. Graduates are a particular boon to rural communities, most vulnerable to the economic and occupational challenges the region has known the past few decades. Another industry noted as a potential booster to a region without textiles and tobacco as occupational powerhouses is ecotourism.
Record #:
24822
Author(s):
Abstract:
National Wiper Alliance Inc. is recognized as the 2015 BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA Small Business of the Year. Company president, Jeff Slosman, founded National Wiper in 1996 when looking for a way to reuse a dilapidated textile mill building in Swannanoa. National Wiper produces nonwoven wipes for restaurants, military contractors, and nursing homes, employs eighty-five, and projects 2015 revenues at $95 million.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24606
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s textile industry faced difficult times in the 2000s after many industries were outsourced. However, Unifi, a textile mill in Yadkinville, found a way to beat the decline of the industry. After years of experimentation and little profit, the company developed Repreve, a fabric made from recycled yarn that is now found in Nike, Patagonia, and Haggar products, as well as Toyota and Ford cars.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p176-178, 180, 182, 184, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
22708
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Clark (1877-1955), an ultra-conservative spokesman for southern textile industrialists, worked to halt child labor legislation in interest of textile mills and the Farmers' States Rights League, which relied heavily on child labor in the early 1900s.
Record #:
17771
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new exhibit at Cameron Art Museum in Wilmington uses spools of thread from abandoned mills to highlight North Carolina's textile industry.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
21731
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the life of David Clark, editor of the 'Southern Textile Bulletin,' a trade journal for textile workers. Clark was born in Raleigh in 1877 and attended North Carolina State College and Cornell University where he received degrees in engineering. The article spends particular time on Clark's role in defending racism in the South and his efforts to protect the interests of the textile industry.
Subject(s):
Record #:
11149
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomasville native Stuart Warren Cramer - architect, author, and inventor - transformed the textile industry and turned the industry in a new direction with his innovations. Her perfected the layout of textile mills, developed an air-conditioning system, and created a first-class mill village.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24159
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glen Raven, Inc. is a 129-year-old textile maker that continues to thrive in Alamance County. The author presents some of the fabrics the company makes and why it has been so successful throughout the years.
Record #:
24193
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheboro-based Fox Apparel struggles to keeps its doors open since 1995, when apparel-manufacturing jobs the United States gave way to technology improvements and low-cost imports.
Record #:
7441
Abstract:
Increased overseas competition has contributed to the decline of North Carolina's textile industry during the last twenty years. A report from Anderson Bauman Tourtellot Vos & Co., a Greensboro-based turnaround company, stresses the need for the industry to change its business models. Two promising niches for the industry are nonwoven fabrics, which have an estimated yearly economic impact of $3 billion in the state, and nanotechnology, which is used in stain proof cloth.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24215
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kannapolis-based textile manufacturer Pillowtex Corp. closed its doors, causing more than 5,000 people to lose their jobs. This article highlights unemployment and the difficulties of finding a job without a high school diploma or many skills.
Record #:
21824
Author(s):
Abstract:
A look at the hillbilly songs of Dave McCarn, a Gastonia, textile mill worker, who wrote about the realities of life for Southern mill workers in the 1920s-30s. McCarn's best-known recording, \"Cotton Mill Colic,\" and its two sequels, criticized the Southern textile industry for failing to pay workers a living wage.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
27876
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Dart’s 1754 inventory demonstrates the strength and diversity of Charles Town, South Carolina’s textile trade in the mid-eighteenth century. It was based on society’s demand for imported foreign-made goods and their search for self-definition. Dart exploited diverse commercial opportunities to reach consumers throughout North Carolina and the eastern region.
Source:
Full Text: