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5 results for "Sharp, Susie Marshall, 1907-1996"
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Record #:
11380
Abstract:
Susie M. Sharp of North Carolina is the only woman ever elected to the post of chief justice of a state supreme court. This article chronicles her career on the bench.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Feb 1975, p23-25, 42, il, por
Record #:
11888
Abstract:
The North Carolina Citizens Association presented this year's Citation for Distinguished Public Service to Susie M. Sharp, the retired chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court. She is the first woman to receive the award and the first in the nation to serve as chief justice of a state supreme court.
Source:
Record #:
41050
Author(s):
Abstract:
W. Kerr Scott, building upon his family’s tradition of public service in Alamance County, initiated progress throughout his home state and in the world, some of which generated controversy. As governor and senator, his accomplishments included 150,000 new electric connections for rural areas and advocating for a world food bank. His appointments of the first woman to the Superior Court and black man to the State Board of Education reflected ideals considered radical by some political rivals.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 7, December 2019, p182-184, 186, 188 Periodical Website
Record #:
41281
Author(s):
Abstract:
This history of North Carolina’s Supreme Court spans over two centuries. Whichard examined its legislature that became more progressive to the benefit of minorities and children. He revealed how over time this assembly of judges became more representative of North Carolina’s population. The author also noted judges who played a formidable role in its development such as John Louis Taylor, Walter Clark, and Sam Ervin IV.
Record #:
5875
Author(s):
Abstract:
Susie M. Sharp blazed a trail for women in the legal profession. In 1926, she was the first woman to attend law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; in 1949, she became the state's first female judge; in 1974, she became the first woman in the nation to be elected a Chief Justice of a state Supreme Court.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 1, June 2003, p84, 86, por Periodical Website
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