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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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23 results for "Renewable energy sources"
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Record #:
30186
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North Carolina has become an important player in renewable energy, with solar and wind farms and other projects attracting billions of dollars. The investment reflects state law requiring utilities to lessen their reliance on coal, natural gas and nuclear sources.
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Record #:
30642
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Electric utilities, including North Carolina's electric cooperatives, are increasing their deployment of affordable, clean, renewable energy sources to generate electricity. Solar power is being used in some places, such as the home shopping retailer QVC distribution center near Rocky Mount, and a Duke Energy solar farm in Davidson County. For most homeowners and businesses, the cost to install solar power systems is expensive.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Jan 2014, p4-5, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30870
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Duke Energy Corporation and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, hope to build three wind turbines set in twenty-foot-deep waters about seven to ten miles into Pamlico Sound west of the Outer Banks village of Avon. A study released in June reported that offshore wind development is capable of generating enough electricity to fulfill North Carolina’s total power needs.
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Record #:
30983
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Over the years, nuclear power plants have been providing a large share of North Carolina’s electricity. As climate change continues to spur both political and public debate, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are supporting the research of new technologies and renewable energy resources in an effort to ensure affordable power while balancing environmental concerns. This article discusses nuclear power generation and its role in the future.
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Record #:
30984
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The largest solar power plant on a building in the Southeast is up and running in Benson, North Carolina. The solar electricity system was designed and installed by Hamlin Energy Solutions. Hamlin produces thirty percent of its own plant’s energy requirements with the rooftop solar system, resulting in a carbon-free method of generating electric power.
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Record #:
30985
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North Carolina’s electric utilities are including natural gas generation as a bigger part of resource plans, along with renewable energy and efficiency measures, in an effort to make up for delayed coal-fired and nuclear generation. This article discusses natural gas consumption in North Carolina, and bridging the gap between now and when advanced low-emissions power generation technologies become available in the future.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
36245
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Discussed was the increasing role that farmers have been playing in the development of renewable energy industries such as solar and wind. Examples profiled were a solar farm owned by Charlotte based Birdseye Renewable Energy LLC, located on a three hundred acre farm in Robeson County. Noted also was Duke’s Dogwood solar farm in Halifax County.
Record #:
36312
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FLS Energy, a solar energy company, joined the ranks of other privately owned businesses with bright economic and occupational futures in North Carolina. Among the other 99 companies highlighted were Ennis-Flint, Rodgers Builders, Camco, Hissho Sushi, and Allen Industries. Factors these businesses often held in common included employees retaining majority ownership, being family owned, and starting with a single product.