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11 results for "Grandfather Mountain"
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Record #:
9613
Abstract:
Grandfather Mountain, the highest peak in the Blue Ridge chain, has been in the Morton family for five generations. Milling discusses the family's stewardship of the mountain, which recently passed to Hugh M. Morton's grandson, Hugh M. Morton, III.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p138-140, 142, 144-145, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36159
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Information related to these animals included differences among the three categories, features of the Virginia Big Eared Bat and Northern Pine Snake, and ways to help such species survive.
Record #:
14999
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One of the grandest of all scenic spots in North Carolina, Grandfather Mountain, may soon be taken over as a state park.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 39, Feb 1943, p23, 29, f
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Record #:
10993
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Hugh Morton is a strong promoter of North Carolina. He is world-famous not only as the developer and promoter of Grandfather Mountain but also as the champion of numerous causes that have affected the lives of nearly every citizen of this state.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1970, p17-20, 43-44, il, por
Record #:
13055
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Hugh Morton, born in 1921, inherited some unique properties: Grandfather Mountain and Fort Fisher. Born into a long line of business and development adventurers, Hugh joined the army in 1943 as a Signal Corps photographer. Hugh came back from the war injured, following the death of his father, Julian, and inherited sizable family debt. But Hugh married and began personally pouring money into the development of Grandfather Mountain; he built a road to the top, opened trails and hung a mile-high swing bridge between the peaks. As the tourism to Grandfather Mountain grows, so does the public persona of Hugh Morton, supporting festivals and associations, and gaining recognition for his good deeds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p8-10, 14, f
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Record #:
857
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Hugh Morton is a conservationist and a photographer of Grandfather Mountain.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 6, Nov 1992, p30-32, por
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Record #:
15636
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In an excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman describes his visit to Roan and Grandfather mountains in western North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p10
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Record #:
24068
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The Grandfather Trail at Grandfather Mountain is an extremely strenuous and daunting trail leading to one of the highest points in the eastern United States, MacRae Peak. The Trail features ladders up rocky cliffs, rock scrambles, narrow passages, and steep inclines, but the view of the wilderness and the Blue Ridge Mountains is well worth the exertion.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p206-210, 212, 214, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
30119
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Grandfather Mountain, one of the most rugged and ancient peaks in the Blue Ridge Mountain range, is being considered for commercial exploitation. Given the war time lack of federal funds, there is call for the people of North Carolina to acquire the property and preserve it.
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Record #:
37608
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Captured through the vast views of Aycock Brown, Hugh Morton, and Bill Russ was nearly a century of North Carolina life and images of beautiful landscapes and historic landmarks. Eighteen of their photos, taken at places like Jockey’s Ridge, the Smoky Mountains National Park, and the Wrightsville Beach Bridge, are showcased in this collection.
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Record #:
8995
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Built in 1885 by J. Erwin Calloway and author Shepherd M. Dugger, the Grandfather Hotel burned to the ground in 1912. Few remember the hotel that stood at the base of Grandfather Mountain. The hotel was owned and operated by Calloway and his wife, Texie, until 1909, after which it was used as a private residence. Shepherd wrote about the hotel in his unpublished autobiography. After the hotel burned, Texie built a the Calloway Inn which she ran for many years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Aug 1980, p28-29, il, por
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