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23 results for "Forest management"
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Record #:
40536
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Living at Linville Gorge’s cliff are plants revealing ancient ecosystems long unknown and trees a retired Appalachian State professor believes are a millennium old. Support for his perspective of cliffs, which include their ecological as well as geological aspects, is a profile of the Table Mountain Pine, in addition to plants like Rock Tripe Lichen and Mountain Golden Heather.
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Record #:
34959
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North Carolina is known as the birth place of American forestry. Pioneers in the field such as Gifford Pinchot and Dr. Carl Schenk began their work in North Carolina, and created tactics such as prescribed burns, selective thinning, and management plans. This has ensured a profitable logging industry while keeping forests sustainable and healthy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p120-134, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
21049
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Walker Ag Group plans to buy N.C. State's Hofmann Forest for $150 million. The North Carolina State Natural Resources Foundation, Inc. and N.C. State University's Board of Trustees of Endowment Fund co-own the 79,000 acres of forest near Jacksonville. The deal is slated to go through; however, an injunction hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, November 12th with proponents of the sale concerned about an agricultural interest group buying the forested property.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 45, Nov 2013, p11 Periodical Website
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Record #:
27758
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NC State University wants to sell Hoffman Forest, but students, professors, and workers at the forest oppose the sale. The NC State Natural Resources Foundation has approved the sale and says it makes sense due to its inconvenient location and the money that could be earned. Those who oppose the sale say that a new buyer will be unlikely to stay true to Julius Hoffman’s vision.
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Record #:
11961
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Clear-cutting is a technique that allows trees to be cut then ground into wood chips on the spot. Over the past several decades this practice has gotten a bad reputation. Hart discusses benefits that come from forests that are managed by cutting timber.
Record #:
28388
Abstract:
The Diana fritillary (Speyeria diana) is a forest-dwelling butterfly of high conservation concern in North Carolina. Observations of the Diana fritillary butterfly are reported in a burned oak-pine forest in the Bald Mountains of North Carolina. Burning may be an important management tool for enhancing the habitat of this species.
Record #:
5367
Author(s):
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Most people remember George Vanderbilt as the builder of Biltmore Estate near Asheville. Less well-known is his influence on forest management in the nation. Surrounding his home were 125,000 acres of forest which he named Pisgah. Vanderbilt was determined that his woods would not be subject to a \"cut down and move on\" policy prevalent in the nation at that time. Ellis discusses Vanderbilt's vision of well-managed forests.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 4, Sept 2002, p146-150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34329
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Researchers at North Carolina State University have recently begun to study vegetation management in forested filter zones to find the combination of cover types best suited to remove or cause the removal of sediments and nutrients. This research extends their work in the Tar-Pamlico Basin, which demonstrated the superiority of dense regrowth following a clear cut over the mature mixed pine-hardwood forest. Detention of sediments was improved while detention of nutrients was dramatically improved.
Record #:
3885
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Carl Schenck, manager of the Biltmore Forest, founded the nation's first forestry school in 1898. The Biltmore Forest School opened the country to the concept of forest management. Today, such new ideas as seeing forests as sustainable and as part of a larger landscape guide forestry management.
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Record #:
5526
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Describes alternative management strategies for forests in Western North Carolina.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, 1993, p21-24, por
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Record #:
26451
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New research on hardwood tree species has shed light on a new forest management technique developed at the Bent Creek Research and Demonstration in Asheville, North Carolina. In the two-aged stand method, trees are harvested but not clear-cut at maturity. A woody understory is then allowed to develop.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 4, Nov/Dec 1993, p13, il
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Record #:
24358
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North Carolina may be chipping away its future and forests by grinding up hardwoods for Japanese paper mills.
Record #:
697
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An environmental donnybrook is brewing in the east as forest practices in wetlands are being scrutinized as never before.
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Record #:
26679
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The Forest Service proposed plans for the Nantahala and Pisgah Forests in North Carolina that are controversial and have generated concern among conservationists. The plans aim to triple timber production from the southeastern national forests, but have negative implications to public lands, wildlife habitat, and outdoor recreation opportunities.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 3/4, May/Aug 1985, p5, il
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Record #:
246
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The authors discuss the ownership and the management of forests in North Carolina, and offer suggestions for the improvement of forest policy in the state.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, June 1983, p24-31, il, bibl, f
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