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106 results for "Folk music"
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Record #:
28964
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Dom Flemons, Kaia Kater, and Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton are among a handful of people of color who are asserting their rightful place in folk, bluegrass, and old-time music. The three musicians recognize the centuries-long impact of racial discrimination in music. Their performance in Raleigh will spotlight the African roots of the banjo, and feature music and songs which use rhetoric as a way to break barriers and open minds.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Feb 2017, p16-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29010
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David Holt, a folk musician from Alamance County, North Carolina, plays the banjo, slide guitar, and bones. The bones are the actual rib bones from a cow, and an ancient rhythm instrument. History and context are important to Holt, as his music is a form of storytelling.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36970
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A self-proclaimed public folklorist, Duffy started the Music Maker organization to help authentic folk musicians.
Record #:
24045
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Rhiannon Giddens is both a solo artist and a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops folk band. Her North Carolina roots, professional training, and a variety of genres influence her music.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 4, September 2015, p100-105, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27742
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NC State junior Clint Bowman recently created a nonprofit to promote North Carolina folk artists to new, young audiences. The concept is to use a small series of concerts to expose artists without a label to new fans. The 20-year old began the project as an assignment for an arts entrepreneur class and made the nonprofit a reality during his summer break. Bowman hopes to expand the project over time.
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Record #:
39471
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The folksong “Barbara Allen” has been documented since the 17th century, but mostly likely originated well before that. The author learned it from his mother, who learned it from her father, who sang it for his children. The song has several variations, but also has three principal melodied to which it is sung or played. The lyrics to the song are transcribed as sung by John Underwood.
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Record #:
38263
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The Old North State was on the mind of a nineteen year old songwriter, who penned “Carolina On My Mind” as tribute to his home state. As the author illustrates, this state’s lifeways and the more famous re-recording of the song is on the minds of many citizens other than James Taylor.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p164-166, 168 Periodical Website
Record #:
20923
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Alice Gerrard, now in her 70s, has spent a lifetime documenting, learning about, and performing traditional American music. Not a native of North Carolina, she took up residence here in 1989. However, even before that she had come here countless times to seek out the musicians who had inspired her for decades. Gerrard received a 2010 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her devoted promotion and advocacy of traditional American music.
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Record #:
36539
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Although Greer was not a traditional folklorist, he contributed greatly to the continuing knowledge of Western North Carolina balladry. He both collected and sang ballads from around the state, along with passing on those he had collected to the /Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore./
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Record #:
36540
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Gladys Kincaid was murdered in Morganton, NC in 1927, inspiring several ballads to be written about the event. Only one of the three recorded ballads has an author and it was composed about a month after the murder. An account of the murder, manhunt, and effects of the event are described.
Record #:
23661
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Olive Dame Campbell was a teacher in the 20th century who worked to record and preserve the songs of Appalachian culture.
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Record #:
36537
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W. Amos Abrams, folklorist and noted contributor to the NCFJ, became interested in folk ballads when he studied under Frank C. Brown at Duke University. He continued his study and collection of ballads throughout his long career as a folklorist.
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Record #:
28358
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North Carolina’s musicians who play a modern version of traditional music are top sellers nationwide this year. The music’s timeless quality and enduring appeal is a reminder to listeners of their personal connections with music. This music connects families and multiple generations and the universities in the state frequently fund study of folk and bluegrass music. Finally, the state’s reputation for producing quality traditional music and the high likelihood that it will be heard anywhere people go contributes to the music’s recent and lasting success.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 51, December 2007, p36-37 Periodical Website
Record #:
36509
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A drum circle in Asheville has become an integral part of the city after existing for over a decade. One drummer starts the beat, and then others pick it up and carry it as a soloist intercedes occasionally and people dance around. Pages 7-12 are photographs of some of the participants.
Record #:
8123
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Traditional mountain music has not fared well over the past decades, and among the younger generations, it was fast becoming almost unknown. Helen White, a guidance counselor for eighteen years in the Alleghany County Schools, is an award-winning songwriter/composer and Fiddlers Grove champion fiddler. Aware of this problem, White began a program at Sparta Elementary School called the Junior Appalachian Musicians program. Students have the opportunity to learn the mandolin, dulcimer, banjo, fiddle, or guitar. Schulman discusses the program's progress since its inception in 2000.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p132-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
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