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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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106 results for "Folk music"
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Record #:
35145
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Abstract:
This is the origin of UNC Chapel Hill’s official song. It is set to the tune of Amici, and was originally sung by a glee club, although many of the lyrics are different now. Several of the verses are included.
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Record #:
35745
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Music from South Turkey Creek is a record that features performances by Bascom Lamar Lunsford and two of his protégés.
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Record #:
35160
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A song inspired by the true event of a woman, Lottie Yates, getting murdered by her husband in Kentucky, 1895. Complete with the lyrics and sheet music.
Record #:
35129
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A song composed by the author complete with the lyrics and sheet music, based upon a story she had read about in a Raleigh newspaper. It was a story about two young girls fighting over a spool of thread, which turned into a family debacle.
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Record #:
35794
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Based on Alan Lomax’s “cantometric analysis” of songs, the author uses that methodology to conduct his own study on Gullah church music on St. Helena’s island.
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Record #:
35746
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In 1958, Mr. Lunsford donated a collection of books on folklore, recordings of folksongs and ballads, scrapbooks, and other manuscripts in honor of his parents.
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Record #:
35028
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A student who went to Chapel Hill for football brought with him a tune from the mountains where he was from; several stanzas from the song are included.
Record #:
35903
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Abstract:
Hosted by Ray Greene, a weekly event of old-time music features fiddling, bluegrass, swing, Christian music, and more.
Record #:
35261
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A woman, Mrs. A. E. Watts, donated a collection of ballads, one of which is included in the article, titled “Song Ballet Rebel Soldier.”
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Record #:
35154
Abstract:
The two songs mentioned in the title are preceded by a short story about a woman that the author had met who sang wonderful folksongs. The two songs recorded were sung by that woman and are titled “My Horses ain’t Hungry,” and “Black Jack Davy.” Each song is accompanied with both the sheet music and lyrics.
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Record #:
35299
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Abstract:
Known now for his Grammy award winning songs, Doc Watson got his start on a radio show in North Carolina. Through an interview, the author followed through on Doc Watsons musical life. This article includes a discography and a poem about his playing by Ardis Kimzey.
Record #:
20923
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Abstract:
Alice Gerrard, now in her 70s, has spent a lifetime documenting, learning about, and performing traditional American music. Not a native of North Carolina, she took up residence here in 1989. However, even before that she had come here countless times to seek out the musicians who had inspired her for decades. Gerrard received a 2010 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her devoted promotion and advocacy of traditional American music.
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Record #:
16301
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Abstract:
Linn interviews Mrs. Bertie Dickens, an old time banjo player from North Carolina about her musical style, the folk revival, and her devotion to the old tunes and old ways.
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Record #:
35271
Abstract:
The song “Ginnie’s gone to Ohio” was popular in the area and the author analyzes its origins, variations, and composition. The article is complete with the lyrics and accompanying sheet music.
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