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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for "Folk art"
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Record #:
29081
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The North Carolina Museum of Art opened a new African gallery featuring decorative and ceremonial artifacts, as well as contemporary artworks. Linda Dougherty, the museum’s chief and contemporary curator, discusses the meaning of the collection and the challenges of merging folk and fine art.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 24, July 2017, p23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27312
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The Blue Ridge Parkway was constructed during the middle 20th century to connect the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Many homesteads were relocated due to eminent domain and the process of roadway construction. Many left behind belongings and furniture now considered folk art. These pieces of folk art can be seen on display in Asheville at the Asheville History Center as part of the Blue Ridge Parkway Exhibit.
Record #:
28694
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Allen and Barry Huffman of Hickory are saving the state’s folk artists. The couple is dedicated to keeping folk artists and their art alive. The couple enjoys finding unique and special pieces and house their finds in the Hickory Museum of Art.
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Record #:
37613
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Works of art produced by the Quilt Trail Project are partly utilitarian; within these decorative squares are stories of people from a region. Six Western North Carolina counties host over two hundred quilt blocks whose stories reflect the history of towns as well as individuals. Examples include a block of an open door, which hangs in a Burnsville bank. The bank’s significance lie in being the only one to stay open in that area during the Great Depression.
Record #:
6694
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Scott Blackwell founded the Immaculate Baking Company, which makes gourmet cookies, in 1995. Blackwell also travels the back roads of the South to find the art of obscure, often elderly folk artists. He promotes this folk art by putting it on packages of his cookies. On the sides of the packages he includes photographs and profiles of the artists. Currently Blackwell is engaged in building the Folk Artist's Museum next to the cookie plant. The museum is scheduled to open in 2006.
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Record #:
36383
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The Farmer-James collection of quilts was a traveling exhibit from January 20-March 14, 2003. It included 37 quilts ranging from Civil War era to the mid-twentieth century. It showcases the difference between folkloristic and artistic treatments of quilt making traditions.
Record #:
36328
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South Carolina face vessels are wheel thrown jugs with human features applied by hand. Originating from enslaved Africans, the tradition grew to be produced by European-American potters.
Record #:
4718
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The North Carolina Folk Heritage Award recognizes those individuals whose work preserves the cultural traditions of families and communities. Winners for the year 2000 are Reverend F. C. Barnes, Marvin Gaster, Melvin L. Owens, Bobby McMillon, Amanda Crowe, and James Allen Rose.
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Record #:
3804
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The John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown and the Penland School of Crafts in Penland are schools where professional artists create and beginners can explore new skills for their own growth and enjoyment. Classes include weaving, pottery, and photography.
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Record #:
4501
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The North Carolina Folk Heritage Award recognizes those individuals whose work preserves the cultural traditions of families and communities. Among the 1998 winners are Bessie Killens Eldreth, traditional mountain singer; Louise Bigmeat Maney, Cherokee potter; Arliss Watford, woodcarver; and Ossie Clark Phillips, quilter.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Spring 1998, p6-7, por
Record #:
2402
Abstract:
Since colonial days, people living in the state's mountains have been creating their own jobs - that is, producing arts and crafts for their own use. Now these items, including hooked rugs and pottery, are highly prized by collectors.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 1, June 1987, p8-9, il
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Record #:
29362
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The art of Long Creek, Pender County, North Carolina native Minnie Evans will be displayed through this spring in the North Carolina Gallery. Evans work is often inspired by a religious vision she had in the 1930s and from her time as a gatekeeper at the Airlie Gardens at Wrightsville Beach. Evans work often incorporates nature and is described as being closer to Near Eastern art than Western prototypes. The approximately 30 works include paintings, drawings, and collages.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 1985-1986, p7-8
Record #:
28855
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Folk life and folk art, such as quilting and bluegrass music, are traditions that have been passed down through time. In our culturally diverse North Carolina communities, folk life continues to evolve, integrating past forms, techniques and values with the present.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p4-5, il
Record #:
342
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Folk art and folk festivals have a rich tradition in North Carolina.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p68-71, il
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Record #:
16324
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North of Chapel Hill on State Route 86 is what looks like a group of small, white, stone doghouses on the side of the road. About twenty structures form White Rock Village, and they are all the work of one man, Henry Warren. White Rock Village is an intriguing and impressive work of folk art, drawing considerable attention to his use of available materials and traditions patterns of stonemasonry.
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