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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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34 results for "Environmental education"
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Record #:
26524
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fur, Fish ‘n Game is a sponsored natural resources camp for youth in North Carolina. Participants learn about the conservation and management of natural resources, so that they may be prepared to face future environmental challenges.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1990, p14, il
Record #:
26606
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Roanoke-Chowan Wildlife Club based in Woodland, North Carolina was selected by the National Wildlife Federation to receive the Chairman’s Award. They were chosen because of the many educational programs that they have initiated for young people and school teachers.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 4, July/Aug 1988, p6
Record #:
2119
Author(s):
Abstract:
One approach to preserving the environment for future generations is to focus on education programs for youth. Two of the Division of Conservation Education's educational programs are N.C. WILD and N.C. CATCH.
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Record #:
3232
Abstract:
N.C. CATCH, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's aquatic resources education program, offers year-round workshops to train teachers and others in hands-on ways to bring the aquatic environment to the classroom.
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Record #:
3740
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For a change of pace while vacationing, families can visit a state park or wildlife refuge. A number of sites, including New River and Pea Island, provide opportunities to learn about an area's plants, animals, climate, and geology.
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Record #:
5150
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Ginger Williams is the new head of the North Carolina Resources Commission's Division of Conservation Education, replacing Sid Baynes who retired in May 2001. Williams has been with the commission ten years and is a graduate of Campbell University.
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Record #:
18498
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Cantrell explains how Trout in the Classroom, a multifaceted learning program, functions. Involved schools are in the Piedmont, foothill, and mountain regions. Besides observing the trout evolve from eggs to fry to fingerlings, students do such activities as monitoring tank water quality, study stream habitats, and learn to appreciate water resources. At the end of the study, fingerlings are released into a selected stream under the supervision of the NC Wildlife Resource Commission fisheries biologists.
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Record #:
26777
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Abstract:
The National Wildlife Week Essay Contest, held in conjunction with the N.C. Wildlife Federation, was conducted in North Carolina schools. A major aspect of the contest aims to increase environmental awareness among students. Due to its successful first year, the contest may become an annual event.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 4, July/Aug 1983, p8-9, por
Record #:
26789
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ted Reed is the quintessential volunteer who has dedicated his time to conservation education. Ted founded the Raleigh Wildlife and Conservation Club and developed programs to teach school children about wildlife conservation and acid rain. He also leads a Boy Scout Troop, which is involved in conservation projects and hunter safety programs.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1983, p9, por
Record #:
28538
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Abstract:
The work of Jessica Potter-Bowers, Lauren Brown, and their Two Sisters Farmstead School is detailed. The school provides natural science education in an academic outdoor classroom for children 3-18. The school teaches naturalist skills, encourages healthy eating practices, permaculture, and farmsteading practices.
Record #:
28766
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mike Zlotnicki has a tradition of clamming with his family and friends every year on their summer vacation. Zlotnicki describes their latest trip and the events that occur. Ethical questions about fishing and hunting are raised and discussed in the essay. Also discussed is the importance of environmental education to preserve these family traditions.
Record #:
28973
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Nile Project is a collective of musicians from countries along the Nile River. The project aims to highlight issues of water use around the globe and to find better ways of managing water resources. North Carolina State LIVE is bringing the Nile Project to Raleigh for a week of programming that includes a concert, a documentary screening, discussions, and a culminating festival.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 9, March 2017, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29011
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Abstract:
Creek Week is a series of nature-themed events put on by a partnership of Durham city and county organizations that's designed to raise awareness about the role of local streams in the ecosystem. Candy Carver created visual imagery for the street and curb surrounding a West Main Street storm drain to show people how the storm drainage system moves into the creeks.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29189
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At North Carolina’s three Small State Forests, visitors can talk to trees by pressing a button. The specially-marked trees play recordings which describe the tree’s ecology, its history, and its use. The Small State Forests were developed to teach the public about forests and how to better care for their land.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
31624
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pick Shin Nature Center, located outside the town of Dobson in Surry County, was developed as a living monument to history as part of an experiment in environmental education. The center features a replica of an old school house, a genuine one-room country store, restored farm equipment, and a log house built and occupied in 1875. In honor of the United States Bicentennial, the center will offer special educational programs recreating farm scenes of the past.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Aug 1976, p12-13, il, por