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34 results for "Environmental education"
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Record #:
28766
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Abstract:
Mike Zlotnicki has a tradition of clamming with his family and friends every year on their summer vacation. Zlotnicki describes their latest trip and the events that occur. Ethical questions about fishing and hunting are raised and discussed in the essay. Also discussed is the importance of environmental education to preserve these family traditions.
Record #:
28973
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Nile Project is a collective of musicians from countries along the Nile River. The project aims to highlight issues of water use around the globe and to find better ways of managing water resources. North Carolina State LIVE is bringing the Nile Project to Raleigh for a week of programming that includes a concert, a documentary screening, discussions, and a culminating festival.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 9, March 2017, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29011
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Abstract:
Creek Week is a series of nature-themed events put on by a partnership of Durham city and county organizations that's designed to raise awareness about the role of local streams in the ecosystem. Candy Carver created visual imagery for the street and curb surrounding a West Main Street storm drain to show people how the storm drainage system moves into the creeks.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34724
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Animal scat, while not an average teaching-aid, has become the center of Ann May’s educational programs for the Wildlife Resource Commission. She details how you can tell the species, gender, age, and diet of an animal based on their scat and even provides a field guide for identification assistance.
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Record #:
28538
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The work of Jessica Potter-Bowers, Lauren Brown, and their Two Sisters Farmstead School is detailed. The school provides natural science education in an academic outdoor classroom for children 3-18. The school teaches naturalist skills, encourages healthy eating practices, permaculture, and farmsteading practices.
Record #:
25090
Author(s):
Abstract:
Educating students on the environment is important. NC State University conducted a study to determine if sending students outside to learn in the field would provide a better understanding of how the environment changes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2013, p24-27, por Periodical Website
Record #:
18498
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cantrell explains how Trout in the Classroom, a multifaceted learning program, functions. Involved schools are in the Piedmont, foothill, and mountain regions. Besides observing the trout evolve from eggs to fry to fingerlings, students do such activities as monitoring tank water quality, study stream habitats, and learn to appreciate water resources. At the end of the study, fingerlings are released into a selected stream under the supervision of the NC Wildlife Resource Commission fisheries biologists.
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Record #:
26366
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Staff of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation traveled around the state to promote wildlife conservation, introduce habitat enhancement projects, and help people become involved in nature.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2003, p3, il
Record #:
5228
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The Highlands Biological Station was founded in 1927 and is part of the University of North Carolina system. The station includes a botanical garden, nature center, research facilities, and public programs. The center focuses on interpreting the natural and cultural heritage of the Southern Appalachians.
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Record #:
5078
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Sid Baynes has retired from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission after 31 years of service. Baynes, a North Carolina State University graduate, began his career as a wildlife biologist. In 1976, he was named chief of the Division of Conservation Education.
Record #:
25246
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Student Outreach Series has educated 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 12th graders on environmental issues in a way they can understand and one that will, hopefully, get them more involved in protecting the environment.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p5, por
Record #:
5150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ginger Williams is the new head of the North Carolina Resources Commission's Division of Conservation Education, replacing Sid Baynes who retired in May 2001. Williams has been with the commission ten years and is a graduate of Campbell University.
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Record #:
25229
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Jim Stephenson discusses all the great opportunities the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation has had in a year of him being director of the organization.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p2, por
Record #:
3740
Author(s):
Abstract:
For a change of pace while vacationing, families can visit a state park or wildlife refuge. A number of sites, including New River and Pea Island, provide opportunities to learn about an area's plants, animals, climate, and geology.
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Record #:
3412
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Abstract:
The Fox Creek Nature Lab, a fifty-two acre outdoor learning project in Louisburg, Franklin County, features a trail with learning stations on water quality, living wetlands, wildlife enhancement, and forestry management.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 8, Aug 1997, p6-7, il