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26 results for "Durham--Description and travel"
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Record #:
28141
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the twentieth anniversary of the film Bull Durham arriving, the author can’t understand why Durham, its residents, and baseball fans love the film. The author describes why the film inaccurately portrays minor league baseball, why it is an unoriginal, poorly cast, and poorly written movie, and how the film did not represent life in Durham.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28158
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some are wondering who is responsible for the problems surrounding the construction of the Durham Performing Arts Center. The city owes millions on the project and the cost of the project has gone beyond its initial projections. The center’s oversight committee will not have much power to monitor the operating agreement the center has with its promoter and booking company. Also, many of the employees who will work in the center will not be able to make a living wage working there.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 47, November 2008, p14-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
28183
Abstract:
The Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC) just opened its theater and the center is filling local residents with pride. The success of the theater depends on more than just Durham residents. Local politicians describe how the center is unique and promote a competition with Raleigh. However, the success of DPAC will depend on the entire Triangle region for it to be a success and local leaders should rethink their marketing strategy.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 49, December 2008, p29 Periodical Website
Record #:
8569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham is a city of many facets. It is the site of the Research Triangle Park, the Duke Medical Center, and 50 percent of the state's biotechnology companies. It is a city that does not like to tear down its history. Buildings that once housed tobacco and textiles represent some of the city's finest architecture. They are now used as offices, shops, restaurants, living spaces, and studios for artists. Wright discusses things to do while visiting Durham, including exploring Civil War history, tobacco history, and African-American history; the arts, such as the American Dance Festival and the Carolina Theatre; and the environment at Eno State Park.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p40-41, il
Record #:
28288
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Golden Belt Manufacturing Company’s textile factory in Durham is being repurposed with a focus on attracting artists. The mixed-purpose space will include many artist studios, living spaces, art-focused retail, an open-air market, restaurants, and a live music venue. The artists are at the center of the plan as the developers hope to create a unique community in the area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 30, July 2007, p25 Periodical Website
Record #:
28289
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham is becoming a national hotbed for spoken-word poetry. The Bull City Slam Team has been successful at national competitions and several festivals have been held in Durham to celebrate the genre. The history of slam poetry in the Triangle area and several area poets are recognized. The poetry has helped many through difficult struggles in their life and has attracted a church-like atmosphere for some.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 30, July 2007, p39-41 Periodical Website
Record #:
7168
Author(s):
Abstract:
This special NORTH CAROLINA magazine community profile supplement discusses the city of Durham. Already known as a world-class medical center, the town is now making a name in pharmaceuticals. Merck is building a $300 million plant that will employ 200. Over the last year thirty-three new or expanded businesses opened, creating over 2,700 new jobs and representing $748 million in investments. Cline discusses Durham's downtown revitalization and things to see and do, such as the American Dance Festival, Duke University basketball games, Central Park, and a number of bookstores.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Apr 2005, p25-26, 28-36, il
Record #:
4016
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once a remote railroad station, Durham is now a leader in medicine, education, and the arts. A number of historic sites offer visitors a look at the city's past and include Bennett Place, the Duke Homestead and Tobacco Museum, Patterson's Mill Country Store, and the Downtown Durham Historic District.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Feb 1999, p16-18, 20, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1248
Author(s):
Abstract:
With a new ballpark on the way and a flurry of downtown activity, Durham is stepping out of its Triangle shadow.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 5, Oct 1993, p25-29, por
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Record #:
28403
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham resident Edie Cohn works on the Homeless People Project to give Durham’s homeless individuals a face and voice. Cohn spends one day each week at Durham’s Community Shelter for HOPE sketching one individual and recording his or her life’s story. Cohn hopes to publish and book and turn the drawings and interviews into a traveling exhibit. The stories and portraits of eight homeless persons from Durham are included in the article.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 29, July 1993, p8-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
24564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Durham Children’s Museum recently opened a Space Exhibit Center that features space artifacts on loan from the Smithsonian and equipment donated by NASA.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 19, March 1972, p10-11, il
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