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26 results for "Durham--Description and travel"
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Record #:
28017
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Abstract:
The R. Kelly Bryant Jr. Pedestrian Bridge was dedicated in Durham this week. The history of the original bridge built in 1973 and how the bridge contributed to crime in the Hayti neighborhood are detailed. The life of R. Kelly Bryant Jr. for whom the bridge is named after and his positive work in the local community are also detailed. The bridge spans the Durham Freeway near Alston Avenue.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 37, September 2010, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
28133
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Greenfire Development is working with Cheryl Chamblee and Tamara Kissane to develop original theater productions in Durham. The development group owns Liberty Warehouse which is an old industrial space turned into a temporary performance space. The group is hoping to spark a collaboration between the arts and downtown development by supporting the artists, providing free rehearsal space, and discounted living spaces while they complete their work.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 17, April 2008, p35 Periodical Website
Record #:
28140
Author(s):
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Locals from Durham remember the filming of Bull Durham. Local residents who served as extras, an audio assistant, and a local bar owner whose bar was in the film remember the filming of the movie. The weather, a day with actor Tim Robbins, stolen memorabilia, long filming days, and parking issues are all shared in stories about the filming of the movie.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28141
Author(s):
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With the twentieth anniversary of the film Bull Durham arriving, the author can’t understand why Durham, its residents, and baseball fans love the film. The author describes why the film inaccurately portrays minor league baseball, why it is an unoriginal, poorly cast, and poorly written movie, and how the film did not represent life in Durham.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28158
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some are wondering who is responsible for the problems surrounding the construction of the Durham Performing Arts Center. The city owes millions on the project and the cost of the project has gone beyond its initial projections. The center’s oversight committee will not have much power to monitor the operating agreement the center has with its promoter and booking company. Also, many of the employees who will work in the center will not be able to make a living wage working there.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 47, November 2008, p14-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
28403
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Durham resident Edie Cohn works on the Homeless People Project to give Durham’s homeless individuals a face and voice. Cohn spends one day each week at Durham’s Community Shelter for HOPE sketching one individual and recording his or her life’s story. Cohn hopes to publish and book and turn the drawings and interviews into a traveling exhibit. The stories and portraits of eight homeless persons from Durham are included in the article.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 29, July 1993, p8-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28183
Abstract:
The Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC) just opened its theater and the center is filling local residents with pride. The success of the theater depends on more than just Durham residents. Local politicians describe how the center is unique and promote a competition with Raleigh. However, the success of DPAC will depend on the entire Triangle region for it to be a success and local leaders should rethink their marketing strategy.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 49, December 2008, p29 Periodical Website
Record #:
28288
Author(s):
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The Golden Belt Manufacturing Company’s textile factory in Durham is being repurposed with a focus on attracting artists. The mixed-purpose space will include many artist studios, living spaces, art-focused retail, an open-air market, restaurants, and a live music venue. The artists are at the center of the plan as the developers hope to create a unique community in the area.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 30, July 2007, p25 Periodical Website
Record #:
28289
Author(s):
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Durham is becoming a national hotbed for spoken-word poetry. The Bull City Slam Team has been successful at national competitions and several festivals have been held in Durham to celebrate the genre. The history of slam poetry in the Triangle area and several area poets are recognized. The poetry has helped many through difficult struggles in their life and has attracted a church-like atmosphere for some.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 30, July 2007, p39-41 Periodical Website
Record #:
29567
Author(s):
Abstract:
Long overshadowed by its sister cities, Raleigh and Chapel Hill, Durham, North Carolina has developed its own image as the Bull City. From its humble origins as a railway depot to its height as a tobacco boomtown, Durham was built by and for working people. Durham has grown over the years, revitalized its downtown atmosphere, and continues to attract visitors to its city.
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Record #:
29568
Abstract:
Durham, North Carolina’s growth spurt has led to a creative food scene and now-thriving downtown. This is a guide to some of the most popular restaurants, shops, and sights that are found in Durham.
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