NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


26 results for "Durham--Description and travel"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
29567
Author(s):
Abstract:
Long overshadowed by its sister cities, Raleigh and Chapel Hill, Durham, North Carolina has developed its own image as the Bull City. From its humble origins as a railway depot to its height as a tobacco boomtown, Durham was built by and for working people. Durham has grown over the years, revitalized its downtown atmosphere, and continues to attract visitors to its city.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29568
Abstract:
Durham, North Carolina’s growth spurt has led to a creative food scene and now-thriving downtown. This is a guide to some of the most popular restaurants, shops, and sights that are found in Durham.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27609
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diane Currier will open Durham’s first meadery this fall. Currier has experimented with home brewing for since 1992 and her mead has won awards from the North Carolina State Fair. Honeygirl Meadery will ferment 200-5000 gallon batches that will be sold in local bottle shops, and restaurants in the Triangle area.
Source:
Record #:
27649
Author(s):
Abstract:
The signs that hang on buildings and advertise restaurants and businesses in Durham are explored. Martha Scotford is professor emeritus in graphic design at NC State University and explains how sign type conveys emotions and how it tells a story. With development in Durham, the personality of the city as told through its signs is explored. Photographs of signs discussed are also presented.
Source:
Record #:
27681
Author(s):
Abstract:
21C Museum Hotel will open in Durham in 2015 in the historic Hill Building. The hotel will feature rooms for rent, an exhibition space for art, a restaurant, and a raw bar. The museum will be free to the public and open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The art hotel concept is one of three in the country and Durham was chosen as a location for its vibrant art community.
Source:
Record #:
27727
Author(s):
Abstract:
Navigating a city can be difficult for the blind as many cities are not easy for them to navigate. With Durham’s recent development, the opportunity is there to design a downtown that is blind-friendly. The challenges of navigating Durham as a vision-impaired individual are documented along with a map that was designed to aid the vision-impaired and raise awareness of their challenges. The map, photographs of difficult obstacles, and personal testimony is included.
Source:
Record #:
27798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Residents of Durham are fighting for control of Old North Durham Park. The 3.6 acre park is home to the only public soccer field in downtown Durham, but many some want to change that. The Friends of Old North Durham Park has presented a master plan for proposed changes to the park. Opponents dislike the plan and say the group intends to gentrify the park and disrupt the local center of community life. There is some evidence the city has neglected the park and many Latino residents feel as if there voice is not being heard on the issue.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 15, April 2011, p7, 11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27933
Abstract:
The TROSA Grocery has opened in East Durham. The nonprofit is part of a regional effort to provide low-income communities access to affordable healthy food. Before TROSA Grocery opened nearest grocery store had been two miles away making the only food available the kinds that are sold in convenience stores. The grocery store will help make shopping more convenient and especially help the elderly and those trying to eat healthy foods.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 20, May 2010, p14-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28044
Author(s):
Abstract:
Philanthropist Dan Hill is the winner of a 2010 Indy Citizen Award for his positive contribution to society in the Triangle area. Hill is responsible for helping to revive the East Durham business district. Hill has helped bring in the TROSA Grocery, Godspeed Internet Café, and Joe’s dinner to the deserted district. The success of the shopping center where the businesses are located has helped restore pride in the neighborhood and provide food to residents who did not have a grocery store nearby.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 47, November 2010, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
27963
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sam Poley is a Durham area chef and the Director of Marketing and Communications at the Durham Convention and Visitors Bureau. Poley discusses the joy he gets from cooking and the fun he had as a chef. Poley has been instrumental in promoting Durham’s restaurants and his work has helped keep a few in business. Poley talks about his job, the restaurant industry in Durham, and cooking.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 26, June 2010, p27 Periodical Website
Record #:
28017
Author(s):
Abstract:
The R. Kelly Bryant Jr. Pedestrian Bridge was dedicated in Durham this week. The history of the original bridge built in 1973 and how the bridge contributed to crime in the Hayti neighborhood are detailed. The life of R. Kelly Bryant Jr. for whom the bridge is named after and his positive work in the local community are also detailed. The bridge spans the Durham Freeway near Alston Avenue.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 37, September 2010, p9 Periodical Website
Record #:
10886
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sauls describes things to see and do, where to stay and where to eat during a weekend visit to Durham.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 10, Mar 2009, p80-82, 84, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
28155
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new art installation by Jaume Plensa is under construction for the DPAC Plaza. The installation will shoot light into the sky and display lines from William Shakespeare’s play Macbeth. Some area residents question whether this really represents Durham or whether the art installation is about trying to compete with Raleigh who rejected an installation by the same artist. Others point out that the work is not as unique as it could be.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 45, November 2008, p29 Periodical Website
Record #:
28133
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greenfire Development is working with Cheryl Chamblee and Tamara Kissane to develop original theater productions in Durham. The development group owns Liberty Warehouse which is an old industrial space turned into a temporary performance space. The group is hoping to spark a collaboration between the arts and downtown development by supporting the artists, providing free rehearsal space, and discounted living spaces while they complete their work.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 17, April 2008, p35 Periodical Website
Record #:
28140
Author(s):
Abstract:
Locals from Durham remember the filming of Bull Durham. Local residents who served as extras, an audio assistant, and a local bar owner whose bar was in the film remember the filming of the movie. The weather, a day with actor Tim Robbins, stolen memorabilia, long filming days, and parking issues are all shared in stories about the filming of the movie.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p17 Periodical Website