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11 results for "Diamond Shoals--History"
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Record #:
35970
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Abstract:
One tale involved whiskey runners during the Prohibition, which inspired the transcribed tune about the town's role in the flourishing of the alcohol trade. Another story that could be considered legend involved the crew of the Crissie Wright, a ship first found drifting around Diamond Shoals. Added to the mystery were the frozen crew of the ship whose drifting ended in Beaufort harbor. The discovery inspired a saying still known in Carteret County, “cold as the night the Crissie Wright came ashore.”
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p22-23
Record #:
4561
Abstract:
In 1890, the U.S. Government awarded experienced marine contractors Anderson & Barr of New Jersey a contract to build a lighthouse on Diamond Shoals, nine miles off Cape Hatteras. The Shoals, an area of strong undersea currents and shifting sands, has doomed many a ship and mariner. It was more than a match for the contractors, despite their heroic efforts. Unable to keep the lighthouse base level because of shifting sands, the workforce withdrew on July 4, 1891, in the face of a hurricane which destroyed the remains of the lighthouse.
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Record #:
36015
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Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59
Record #:
14396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lighthouses are a familiar site along the coastline, and this article looks at a particular location along Diamond Shoals that was so inhospitable a lighthouse could not be constructed. The government attempted to place lighthouses at that location on two different occasions. The final solution was not a permanent installment but a lightship. The history and cost of these projects are outlined in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 51, May 1949, p3, 20, il
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Record #:
12082
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Abstract:
Five attempts at constructing a lighthouse on the dangerous Diamond Shoals prior to 1894 failed. Proving too difficult a project to undertake, a lightship was stationed 15 miles off shore to warn mariners of the perilous shifting shoals.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Aug 1956, p9-10, il
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Record #:
35938
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Mrs. J.D. Barnett recounted the WWI sinking of the Diamond Shoals lightship by German submarines, an event reported in the local newspaper. As for the source of the entire story, that her father in law, captain of the sunken lightship.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p21-23
Record #:
35990
Abstract:
The former Maude Miller had an eventful career history. She was first a schoolteacher at what was called a "pay school" by Hatteras Island residents. She became the county welfare supervisor during the 1930s, gaining experience with the Depression’s effects on the Island. As a postmistress, she was second generation employee (her father served during the 1800s). During World War II, she was a Coastal Observer, with the Navy issuing a service certificate. Of her late husband, Estus Preston White, she noted their common work background in education, with his work on the Board. His local administrative roles included chairman of Methodist Sunday School and electric plant, as well as county administrative work as a commissioner.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p52-59
Record #:
35957
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Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38
Record #:
29920
Abstract:
Cape Hatteras is known as one of the most dangerous coastlines in the world, particularly because of the Diamond Shoals. Located 16 miles off Hatteras Island, Diamond Shoal's shifting sands have earned the area the Graveyard of the Atlantic, and if it weren't for the aid of the Life Saving Service, even more ships would have been wrecked.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p46-47, por
Record #:
24619
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This article presents an eye-witness account of the famous wrecking event of the USS MONITOR (ship), one of the first iron-clad warships ever built, in the Diamond Shoals off Cape Hatteras. The account was originally in ‘Harper’s Weekly’ in 1863.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 4, July 1963, p9, 27, il
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