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6 results for "Currituck County--Coastal Management"
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Record #:
35578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Albemarle, in addition to being the name of a major waterway, comprises ten counties of the Coastal Region. How it contributed more than a name was expressed in agricultural income, as well as the Currituck Plan designed to improve the underdeveloped Outer Banks.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p24
Record #:
39783
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author underscored the delicate balancing act: on one side, protection of wildlife and environment of coastal counties like Carteret; on the other, prosperity of the region's tourism industry and its hotspots like the Shackleford Banks.
Record #:
34208
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources conducted a study at Currituck County Outer Banks in response to property owners requesting a Capacity Use Area designation under the Water Use Act of 1967. This would restrict water withdrawals from the surficial aquifer, which is the sole source of drinking water for Currituck. The study concluded that if a management plan is not prepared by 2000, then the designation should be considered.
Record #:
18986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Coastal development requires a balanced approach to both stimulate economic development while also preserving natural resources. In 1972, plans for development in Currituck County were halted to allow a team of architects, engineers, ecologists, economists, and local officials create a thorough, multi-disciplinary plan for the county's coastal land use. Specifics of their plan and potential use as a model for the entire state's coastal region are discussed.
Source:
North Carolina Architect (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 20 Issue 5; 6, May/June 1973, p7-22, il
Record #:
38703
Author(s):
Abstract:
With ever changing sands and various storms, the geography of the Outer Banks is always in a state of flux. In an attempt to stave off the change from land to sea, a wooden fence was erected along the Currituck Sound to help build up sand dunes and keep back the sea.
Record #:
19383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Currituck is a county divided. On the one side are planned communities of expensive beach houses who cater to tourists and weekend and seasonal residents. On the other side are stretches of uninhabited beach and marsh owned by the state and federal governments, and small villages of long-term residents. Developers are attempting to bridge the gaps that deny access to many parts of the area but others don't want the change from isolation.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Jan 1991, p2-4, map, f Periodical Website