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24 results for "Construction industry"
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Record #:
38233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heather Denny overcame this employment-related barrier, often present in the construction field. How she overcame it is revealed in responses such as why she chose the construction field, her definition of success, and advice she would give her younger self about choosing this career path.
Record #:
36262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Promise noted in five profiled individuals, employed by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, also held a potential to enhance the quality of life. The research endeavors by these individuals promised to tackle issues such as obesity, colon cancer, emissions, and pavement quality.
Record #:
11825
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jobs for construction companies are becoming more competitive. Where two or three might have been in competition in the past, it is not unusual to have a dozen or more competing for the same job due to current economic conditions. Revenues rank the top twenty-five contractors in the state. Barnhill Contracting Company in Tarboro ranked first with $522 million in revenues.
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Record #:
28356
Author(s):
Abstract:
Griffin Todd details how his experiences working a contracting job repairing concrete sidewalks at East Carolina University reflect the racial bias in public projects. Todd and other black contractors cite a culture of racism in the construction industry which is often played out through complex contract negotiations. This prevents authorities from stepping in and taking action. Todd and others discuss how larger contractors who hire their smaller firms often target them to make up for lost costs and how the state’s university system should better monitor the big firms who are taking advantage of them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 50, December 2007, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
4445
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1999, construction companies did not lack for projects statewide. However, the state's low unemployment level (3.2 percent in October 1999) caused many companies to have project backlogs because there were not enough workers. This worker shortage lengthened many job completions by 10 to 20 percent. Many companies are offering incentives to hourly workers, like health insurance and 401(k)s.
Record #:
4547
Author(s):
Abstract:
Contractors do not lack projects in North Carolina. What they lack is a timely supply of building materials. Nationwide, a nine-year economic expansion and a heavy demand for new construction help suppliers' keep plants running at their maximum and beyond. Even with supply difficulties, the state's top thirty contractors saw revenues increase 4 percent to around $3.3 billion in 1999.
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Record #:
3252
Abstract:
In 1996, commercial and industrial construction were among the state's twenty largest projects. They included Charlotte's 201 North Tryon office tower ($116 million) and Duke University Medical Center expansion ($88 million).
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Record #:
35440
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Abstract:
Designing correctional facilities is a complex business, according to author Elizabeth Cozart. Aiding in the understanding of their complex design considerations was a discussion of factors such as security, budget, time frame, and appearance. Included were examples of correctional facilities from Henderson, Rowan, and Durham counties.
Source:
North Carolina Architecture (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, 1997, p10-20
Record #:
35438
Author(s):
Abstract:
A speedway of this size was the dream of Dennis Yates of Yates-Chreitzburg Architects. Featured as part of this business owner’s dream come true was Yates’ long time interest in racing tracks and the more recent history behind the construction of this sports facilities, proclaimed as the largest in the United States.
Source:
North Carolina Architecture (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, 1997, p7-8
Record #:
2473
Abstract:
In 1995, commercial and industrial construction are among the state's twenty largest projects. They include Raleigh's Crabtree Valley Mall expansion ($100 million) and Wilmington's Corning Plant expansion ($150 million).
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept 1995, p46-49,51,53,55-56,58, il Periodical Website
Record #:
918
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Holland, Chairman and CEO of Charlotte-based United Dominion, which provides industrial products and engineering and construction services, discusses how his company has coped with the recession.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Jan 1993, p10-13, por
Record #:
1169
Author(s):
Abstract:
With few office towers, industrial plants and large shopping centers on the drawing board or under construction, the nonprofit sector has become the focal point of the state's building industry. Four out of the 10 largest projects in the state involve nonprofit organizations.
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Record #:
12926
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Abstract:
Gennett reports on the construction industry in the Carolinas where over 3,500 firms hire six percent of the workforce.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Aug 1988, p32-34, 51-52, il, por
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Record #:
14869
Author(s):
Abstract:
While many developers, local officials, and chambers of commerce worry about the construction market overheating, the boom continues around the state. Adams examines construction in the state's three largest markets which account for over half of the projects reported - Raleigh/Durham Research Triangle, Charlotte/Mecklenburg, and the Piedmont Triad of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p41-42, 44-45, 47, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14870
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA profiles four key players in the state's construction industry - J. M. Dixon Inc.; Jones Group Inc.; G. Smedes York; and Henry Faison.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p50-51, 53-54, 56-58, por Periodical Website
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